it seems that I lost password

13 replies [Last post]
panties
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Joined: 02/02/2021

Hello,
I got a X200, then flashed the BIOS, started to install Trisquel9 by text mode. At the end of installing, while GRUB was unintentionally installed, at 66%, the process and the screen freezed. I was able to enter to something called bash-like something by entering Ctrl+Alt+F1 but I did not know what I had to do. But the command "reboot" worked.
I was able to see the GRUB menu. And I was able to remember the password to unlock the full disk encrypted HDD. But at the login screen, it seemed something different to the usual login screen. And I was not able to remember the password.
Now in live iso Trisquel9 session, I am seeing the decrypted HDD, there are alot of folders, but I do not know how to set/change the password. Would you tell me how to change it? By the way, and the home partition is empty.
I have another x200. If I copied the home partition of the another x200, then pasted it into the new system, can I use it as a copy of the old system? Would it work well?
Thanks very much. Have a good day. (^v^)/

panties
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Joined: 02/02/2021

By the way, I am sure I can remember the lost password (but it does not work) but I am a bit not sure if I typed the username correctly when I was installing the system. So can I change or confirm it too?

Geshmy
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Joined: 04/23/2015

In the live OS, if you have the encrypted drive decrypted and mounted, I wonder if you can use your file manager to navigate to /etc and > right click and > choose 'open terminal here.' If so,
$ sudo cat passwd
will show you all the 'users' that are created. You should be able to find out what your user name is.

If the file manager doesn't offer 'open terminal here' you'll have to figure out the path to /'encrypted_drive'/etc/passwd. Which you might be able to do using the file manager's > right click > copy path function and then do
$ sudo cat 'Paste that path'

Hope that helps.

panties
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Joined: 02/02/2021

I was able to open the terminal by right click. Indeed, there were a lot of usernames in the /etc/passwd but I could not understand which was my username. I reinstalled the system and it works fine now. Thank you anyway.

Magic Banana

I am a member!

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Joined: 07/24/2010

The user Trisquel's installer creates has the uid 1000. Its name can therefore be printed in this way:
$ awk -F : '$3 == 1000 { print $1 }' passwd

panties
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Joined: 02/02/2021

Thank you. I don't understand what you are talking about, though. $1...

loldier
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Joined: 02/17/2016

To find out the user name that was created when the system was installed.

trisquel_user.png
loldier
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Joined: 02/17/2016

Duplicate post.

panties
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Joined: 02/02/2021

I see. It worked. But it is too late. Because I already reinstalled the system. Though thank you anyway.

gaseousness
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Joined: 08/25/2020

awk -F : '$3 == 1000 { print $1 }' /etc/passwd

^ didn't just know to use one in /etc/ for me or whatever

Magic Banana

I am a member!

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Joined: 07/24/2010

In the context of Geshmy's post, it is actually not the passwd file in /etc, because that would be that of the live system. It the passwd file of the installed system.

Geshmy
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Joined: 04/23/2015

The old 'reinstall to resolve' program. Been there, done that. Heh, heh...:>

panties
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Joined: 02/02/2021

I have not reinstalled Windows, iOS, android. No customer service would tell you "Please try to reinstall the OS." when you call them to ask about trouble. I cannot tell how many times I reinstalled Trisquel.

panties
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Joined: 02/02/2021

"Enix's 1986 and 1987 Japanese Famicom releases of its highly successful first two Dragon Quest (Dragon Warrior) RPGs used passwords composed from a set of 64 hiragana. However, the 1988 third game in the series and Nintendo's international releases of the first two for the NES in 1989 and 1990 used battery-backed saves." (Wikipedia)

I always set relatively long passwords, but usually those are shorter than 64 characters. We used to write down the very long passwords on a piece of paper. If you have lost the password, or mistaken the passwords, you would know the curious emptiness. It is enough if you experience it once. A lot of mothers would have thrown the precious paper away while they were cleaning up their houses, intentionally, or unintentionally.

The feeling when you start reinstalling may be similar to the feeling of pressing the reset button on a frozen NES (Nintendo Family Computer). So we may be more tolerant of that kind of thing than the younger generation.