Learning Emacs and Lisp

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Sabrinakitty
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Joined: 06/17/2020

Hello
I want to learn Emacs and eLisp, can you recommend good books about that?
Next, I want to learn some Lisp dialect, but there are so many of them. What must I learn, Common Lisp, Clojure, something else? Haskell? Are there good books about those languages?

Thank you!

loldier
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Joined: 02/17/2016
Magic Banana

I am a member!

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Joined: 07/24/2010

For a start, you can follow the "Emacs Tutorial", accessible from its "Help" menu.

calher

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Joined: 06/19/2015

On 9.7.2020 2:45, name at domain wrote:
> Hello
> I want to learn Emacs and eLisp, can you recommend good books about that?

Emacs has a book built in. I got the printed copy.

https://shop.fsf.org/books/signed-introduction-programming-emacs-lisp-3rd-edition

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loldier
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Joined: 02/17/2016

That's good to know. Here's a link to the pdf. It should be essentially the same as the printed book.

https://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/manual/pdf/eintr.pdf

andyprough
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Joined: 02/12/2015

The two Gnu's dancing on the front are really cute.

andyprough
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Richard Stallman learned emacs by writing it from scratch 3 different times. Probably a bit too much of a learning curve though.

koszkonutek
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Joined: 03/19/2020

There surely are good books for Common Lisp :)

I read a bit of "Land of Lisp" by Conrad Barski and "Practical Common Lisp" by Peter Seibel[1]. The first one was quite funny, the second one seemed more serious. There's also famous Paul Graham's famous "On Lisp"[2].

As to which one is best to learn... Well, only You know what You need or what You like the most.

Clojure would be suitable if You like JVM (wait, what?). I heard it uses actor model like Scala/Akka and Erlang. It's not, however, the only lisp on the JVM - there's also ABCL (a Common Lisp implementation) and probably more I've never heard about.

In general scheme seems more clean and pure than Common Lisp. Common Lisp, on the other hand, is more mature. You CAN actually write useful programs that will run portably on many Common Lisp implementations - in case of Scheme Your project is often bound to the implementation You chose at the beginning.

If you like functional programming, well, Owl Scheme is a a PURE functional language. Most other lisps have some impurities.

In the end, any of the lisps will let you get some general idea of the language :)

Btw, Haskell is not a lisp... Which doesn't mean it's not worth learning. Actually, Erlang carries more similarities to Lisp than Haskell does (even dotted lists are there!). And there's even a usable lisp implementation for Erlang's virtual machine[3] (although I've never heard of any1 using it for anything)

[1] http://www.gigamonkeys.com/book/
[2] http://www.paulgraham.com/onlisp.html
[3] http://lfe.io/

Sabrinakitty
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Joined: 06/17/2020

Thank you, everyone!

Someone recommended me Racket language and the book How to Design Programs by Matthais Felleisen
Is Racket a good Lisp dialect?

koszkonutek
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Joined: 03/19/2020

I heard of Racket as a speed-focused scheme dialect. And I think it's also one of the most popular schemes out there. That means more libraries, better support, etc., which makes it quite a good choice :)

Sabrinakitty
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Joined: 06/17/2020

Thank you!
I've found they offer free online version of their Racket book on official site
https://htdp.org/2020-5-6/Book/index.html

ronniekeys
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Joined: 07/16/2020

Hi there! I'm on the same road, trying to learn more about Lisp. This blogpost provides a lot of info for us newbies!

https://stevelosh.com/blog/2018/08/a-road-to-common-lisp

Sabrinakitty
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Joined: 06/17/2020

Thank you!