TiVo solution

29 respuestas [Último envío]
pascal@diogoantunes.org
Desconectado/a
se unió: 09/03/2012

Hi,
I would to know what are the free solutions for the digital video
recorder TiVo?
Libere,
Pascal Diogo Antunes.

MagicFab
Desconectado/a
se unió: 12/13/2010

On 2013-04-29 12:03, Pascal Diogo Antunes wrote:
> Hi,
> I would to know what are the free solutions for the digital video
> recorder TiVo?
> Libere,
> Pascal Diogo Antunes.

I use TVHeadEnd in a virtual machine, with two HD Homerun network
digital dual-tuners. This summarized my setup but it's in French:
http://www.fabianrodriguez.com/blog/2013/01/18/exit-la-tele-par-cable-bienvenue-a-lenregistreur-numerique-libre

My setup uses a minimal Trisquel installed with the network/mini
installer. It runs as a VM under a Proxmox host, be careful to use
regular kernel (as opposed to minimal kernel designed for
virtualization) so the DVB drivers are included.

This also has a free open source client for Android (TVH Guide):
https://github.com/john-tornblom/TVHGuide

Although the resulting files required proprietary codecs to play (at
least ATSC raw datain NorthAmerica does), Trisquel itself doesn't
require any non-free codecs to record the streams.

For playback, I transcode with Handbrake or watch directly on my TV,
shared via miniDLNA server on a Debian NAS. You could also use XBMC as a
front-end.

Cheers,

Fabian

--
Fabián Rodríguez
http://trisquel.magicfab.ca

jxself
Desconectado/a
se unió: 09/13/2010

Fabian Rodriguez said:
> Although the resulting files required proprietary codecs to play (at
> least ATSC raw datain NorthAmerica does), Trisquel itself doesn't
> require any non-free codecs to record the streams.

There are free software programs to play MPEG-2 video and AC-3 audio
(the codecs used for digital television in the U.S. at least) - Namely
things like VLC and GNOME's Totem, among others.

Let's try not to confuse "proprietary" with "patent-encumbered", okay?
They are very different matters.

pascal@diogoantunes.org
Desconectado/a
se unió: 09/03/2012

On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 12:33:17 -0400
Fabian Rodriguez <name at domain> wrote:

> On 2013-04-29 12:03, Pascal Diogo Antunes wrote:
> > Hi,
> > I would to know what are the free solutions for the digital video
> > recorder TiVo?
> > Libere,
> > Pascal Diogo Antunes.
>
> I use TVHeadEnd in a virtual machine, with two HD Homerun network
> digital dual-tuners. This summarized my setup but it's in French:
> http://www.fabianrodriguez.com/blog/2013/01/18/exit-la-tele-par-cable-bienvenue-a-lenregistreur-numerique-libre
>
> My setup uses a minimal Trisquel installed with the network mini
> installer. It runs as a VM under a Proxmox host, be careful to use
> regular kernel (as opposed to minimal kernel designed for
> virtualization) so the DVB drivers are included.
>
> This also has a free open source client for Android (TVH Guide):
> https://github.com/john-tornblom/TVHGuide
>
> Although the resulting files required proprietary codecs to play (at
> least ATSC raw datain NorthAmerica does), Trisquel itself doesn't
> require any non-free codecs to record the streams.
>
> For playback, I transcode with Handbrake or watch directly on my TV,
> shared via miniDLNA server on a Debian NAS. You could also use XBMC as a
> front-end.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Fabian
>
>
> --
> Fabián Rodríguez
> http://trisquel.magicfab.ca
>

I don't know TVHeadEnd.
Thanks for your link.
And for a TV tuner box, how can I be sure it will be free and safe?
Which are the best? You have HDHomeRun box, what are others choices I
have? TV tuner card are interested?

MagicFab
Desconectado/a
se unió: 12/13/2010

On 2013-04-30 05:29, Pascal Diogo Antunes wrote:
> I don't know TVHeadEnd.
> Thanks for your link.
> And for a TV tuner box, how can I be sure it will be free and safe?
> Which are the best? You have HDHomeRun box, what are others choices I
> have? TV tuner card are interested?

You're very welcome.

The HDHomerun devices are networked, so you can get a stream on any PC
capable enough (keep in mind it's full HD streaming over LAN).

That's one of the reasons I got those instead of USB/PCI devices: zero
setup to stream.

Once TVHeadend is properly configured you can click on HTML links to
stream to VLC, or stream to Android via the app I mentioned.

Watching a stream will occupy a tuner, so if you want to record and
watch, you will need at least two tuners (or a dual-tuner). I often
found myself wanting to record two concurrent shows or sometimes having
very small conflicts (one show ends, the next one overlaps, and another
one is recording already -> 3 tuners needed), so I ended up with 4
tuners (2xdual). This will probably cost double of similar PCI/USB
setups but for the convenience I found it's well worth it.

Cheers,

Fabian

--
Fabián Rodríguez
http://trisquel.magicfab.ca

jxself
Desconectado/a
se unió: 09/13/2010

I use MythTV.

pascal@diogoantunes.org
Desconectado/a
se unió: 09/03/2012

On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 10:23:05 -0700 (PDT)
"Jason Self" <name at domain> wrote:

> I use MythTV.

I will try. Thanks.
I don't know if somebody have already tested GeeXbox or Freevo.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GeeXboX
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freevo
Will see.

I'm not a TV user. I don't really like television and its programs -
above all, advertising. I want help my family to shut off ads and
record what they want to watch when they want - and not when
television programation wants.
For commercials blocking, I will see later for software solutions.
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/D%C3%A9tection_automatique_des_publicit%C3%A9s_t%C3%A9l%C3%A9vis%C3%A9es#La_suppression

Maybe I will turn a laptop (unused) as HTPC for listening music and
radio. So why not recording TV?
I have not yet a NAS. But I will use an old (multimedia) Hard Disk to
share it on network. Normally I have all I need to do it.

Thanks. If you have advices - not commercials :D - I take it.

Libere,
Pascal Diogo Antunes.

Darksoul71
Desconectado/a
se unió: 01/04/2012

Pascal,

you are not very specific about how you receive TV.
Is is terristial ? Via satellite ? via cable ?

The cheapest PVR (= personal video recorder) I could imagine would be a cheap DVB-S2 receiver. At least for Europe and free to air satellite you usually pay below 50€ for a standard receiver which can record DVB-S2 (= HD stuff) to a USB hdd.

A bit more expensive but more flexible:
Using OpenElec, YaVDR and so on to set up a PC as PVR. This usually invoves buying some "TV card" as PCI or USB solution. I strongly suggest you grab one at e-bay. I only payed 15€ for a used DVB-S PCI card which now runs in my HTPC.

HTH,
Holger

MagicFab
Desconectado/a
se unió: 12/13/2010

On 2013-04-30 05:31, name at domain wrote:
> The cheapest PVR (= personal video recorder) I could imagine would be a
> cheap DVB-S2 receiver. At least for Europe and free to air satellite you
> usually pay below 50€ for a standard receiver which can record DVB-S2 (=
> HD stuff) to a USB hdd.
>
> A bit more expensive but more flexible:
> Using OpenElec, YaVDR and so on to set up a PC as PVR. This usually
> invoves buying some "TV card" as PCI or USB solution. I strongly suggest
> you grab one at e-bay. I only payed 15€ for a used DVB-S PCI card which
> now runs in my HTPC.

You will still need as many tuners/cards as you want to record/watch
concurrently.

F.

--
Fabián Rodríguez
http://trisquel.magicfab.ca

Darksoul71
Desconectado/a
se unió: 01/04/2012

Hi,

to my best knowledge there is no such thing as a free solution for providing such functionality as a Tivo.
At least most modern cards (DVB-T / DVB-S / DVB-S2 / DVB-C) rely on non-free firmware files. May be there is a small minority of cards which runs without non-free blobs but I do not know any. This applies both to PCI, PCIe and USB devices.

Thus the simplest solution might be buying a free to air receiver for the system of your choice (DVB-X) or accept the necessity of firmware files and run a "not so free" system with OpenElec, YaVDR or something like that.

I am more pragmatic here as I have both a cheap DVB-S2 receiver and a HTPC running YaVDR. Keep this in mind: A GNU Linux PC with non-free firmware on it gives the user more control over the device than running a closed platfom like a DVB-X receiver.

This is of course not FSF-compliant.

HTH,
Holger

MagicFab
Desconectado/a
se unió: 12/13/2010

On 2013-04-30 04:53, name at domain wrote:
> to my best knowledge there is no such thing as a free solution for
> providing such functionality as a Tivo.
> At least most modern cards (DVB-T / DVB-S / DVB-S2 / DVB-C) rely on
> non-free firmware files. May be there is a small minority of cards which
> runs without non-free blobs but I do not know any. This applies both to
> PCI, PCIe and USB devices.

The HDHomerun networked tuners that I mentioned don't require any
non-free software on your PC - in fact there are free open source DVB
drivers for them (which specifically take care of capturing the
networked stream as opposed to on-board/USB from a local device).

An added advantage is separating the storage, front-end and back end. I
initially run this setup on the family PC but it required more
maintenance and restarting as its software changed often, as opposed to
a dedicated virtual machine that almost never changes configuration
(except for updates).

F.

--
Fabián Rodríguez
http://trisquel.magicfab.ca

lembas
Desconectado/a
se unió: 05/13/2010

>This is of course not FSF-compliant.

Then please don't suggest it here.

Darksoul71
Desconectado/a
se unió: 01/04/2012

@Lembas: I do not see an issue with th HD Homerun network tuners that Fabian refers to. They are not an integral part of a Trisquel-based PC but connected to the LAN. Unless firmware is required for accessing them for recording, I see nothing that is non-free.

lembas
Desconectado/a
se unió: 05/13/2010

@Darksoul71 That was aimed at you.

Darksoul71
Desconectado/a
se unió: 01/04/2012

@lembas: Sry....this was not obvious to me...

By the way: HDHomeRun seem to rely on firmware as well:

From: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/HDHomeRun
...
Download firmware
The latest firmware is available from the SiliconDust website.
...

The question is though what license this firmware has....

MagicFab
Desconectado/a
se unió: 12/13/2010

On 2013-04-30 10:02, name at domain wrote:
>
> By the way: HDHomeRun seem to rely on firmware as well:
>
> From: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/HDHomeRun
> ...
> Download firmware
> The latest firmware is available from the SiliconDust website.
> ...
>
> The question is though what license this firmware has....

It's most definitely non-free! It's also not ideal because I know for a
fact it does "phone home" to Silicon Dust for support (this is clearly
documented). I haven't investigated more at this point but it would be a
good idea to ask SD if they'd consider publishing their firmware for the
smaller tuners (or all) under a free license.

Speaking of firmware, the Linux Libre kernel changelogs gives a good
indication of which USB DVB cards to *avoid*, this list includes all
that would nbeed to load non-free firmware:
http://linux-libre.fsfla.org/pub/linux-libre/releases/3.9-gnu/linux-libre-3.9-gnu.log

Cheers,

F.

--
Fabián Rodríguez
http://trisquel.magicfab.ca

quiliro@congresolibre.org
Desconectado/a
se unió: 10/28/2010

El 30/04/13 09:41, Fabian Rodriguez escribió:
> Speaking of firmware, the Linux Libre kernel changelogs gives a good
> indication of which USB DVB cards to *avoid*, this list includes all
> that would nbeed to load non-free firmware:
> http://linux-libre.fsfla.org/pub/linux-libre/releases/3.9-gnu/linux-libre-3.9-gnu.log

That is a fine list. Would it be possible to use this list to check a
running kernel for the use of these files in order to tell the users
they have non free software running on their systems? A package in this
line of thought would be useful. It could also advertise distros which
contain only free firmware (and software).

--
Saludos libres,

Quiliro Ordóñez
Presidente (en conjunto con el resto de socios)
Asociación de Software Libre del Ecuador - ASLE
Av de la Prensa N58-219 y Cristóbal Vaca de Castro
Quito, Ecuador
(02)-600 8579
IRC: http://webchat.freenode.net?channels=asle&uio=OT10cnVlJjEwPXRydWU3a

Todo correo que reciba será tratado como información pública, de libre copia y modificación, sin importar cualquier nota de confidencialidad.

jxself
Desconectado/a
se unió: 09/13/2010

Quiliro Ordóñez asked:

> That is a fine list. Would it be possible to use this list to check a
> running kernel for the use of these files in order to tell the users
> they have non free software running on their systems?

Probably but it seems to me that there are two problems:

1. A distribution that includes proprietary software will probably not
be interested in advertising this stuff to the people using said
distribution, so even if such a program existed it's not likely that
said distribution would include such a program, leaving us with item #2:

1. The user of said distribution could install and run it on their own
but if they're doing that it means they're already concerned about
freedom and in that case they could just swap out the distro's kernel
for Linux-libre (my APT repository makes that easy for GNU/Linux
distros that use APT like Ubuntu), or better yet: Switch to a fully
free distro instead because the kernel is probably not the only
problematic piece of software in the distribution.

> A package in this
> line of thought would be useful. It could also advertise distros which
> contain only free firmware (and software).

You mean like http://www.gnu.org/distros ? :)

quiliro@congresolibre.org
Desconectado/a
se unió: 10/28/2010

El 30/04/13 11:29, Jason Self escribió:
> Quiliro Ordóñez asked:
>
>> A package in this
>> line of thought would be useful. It could also advertise distros which
>> contain only free firmware (and software).
> You mean like http://www.gnu.org/distros ? :)

Yes.

--
Saludos libres,

Quiliro Ordóñez
Presidente (en conjunto con el resto de socios)
Asociación de Software Libre del Ecuador - ASLE
Av de la Prensa N58-219 y Cristóbal Vaca de Castro
Quito, Ecuador
(02)-600 8579
IRC: http://webchat.freenode.net?channels=asle&uio=OT10cnVlJjEwPXRydWU3a

Todo correo que reciba será tratado como información pública, de libre copia y modificación, sin importar cualquier nota de confidencialidad.

Darksoul71
Desconectado/a
se unió: 01/04/2012

Fab,

so in term of suggesting / promoting non-free devices you Silicon Dust devices are not "better" than using a TV adapter which relies on a firmware blob.

Not to sound offensive but such a list is useless since most likely 90 to 95% of the consumer devices available rely on firmware files.

Devices without relying on blobs are like the needle in the haystack ;)
...but I guess that is something which Chris could tell us more on his search for a blob-free device.

Cheers,
H.

MagicFab
Desconectado/a
se unió: 12/13/2010

On 2013-05-01 03:09, name at domain wrote:
> so in term of suggesting / promoting non-free devices you Silicon Dust
> devices are not "better" than using a TV adapter which relies on a
> firmware blob.

I believe they are much better, yes. They give unlimited access to
unencrypted streams in programmatic ways in addition to exposing the
hardware to free open source drivers and software without touching the
OS. They have achieved an abstraction layer that I consider a good design.

Perfect, and compliant with my ethics and freedom objectives, no. I made
that clear in several ways in my posts.

Have you asked them to license their firmware freely? That is what came
up after the discussion on this thread. I don't have timne to pursue
this. Chris or someone else could strike a deal and work with them like
he did with QCA, I previously discussed this device with him - I doubt
there is market for it just by seing the negative comments about pricing
on the USB wifi device that just came out. I think it's a smart business
decision to wait.

> Not to sound offensive but such a list is useless since most likely 90
> to 95% of the consumer devices available rely on firmware files.

Actually that would be 100%. The HD Homerun device doesn't rely on
firmware files on your PC, it already has them onboard. As such your
system can be considered almost free (BIOS?..).

Your use of "most likely" while citing statistics without sources is not
useful, on the other hand. Please don't do that.

> Devices without relying on blobs are like the needle in the haystack ;)
> ...but I guess that is something which Chris could tell us more on his
> search for a blob-free device.

Please don't GUESS - ask him directly, or do the search yourself and
report back here.

F.

--
Fabián Rodríguez
http://fsf.magicfab.ca

pascal@diogoantunes.org
Desconectado/a
se unió: 09/03/2012

On Wed, 01 May 2013 07:20:08 -0400
Fabian Rodriguez <name at domain> wrote:

> On 2013-05-01 03:09, name at domain wrote:
> > so in term of suggesting / promoting non-free devices you Silicon Dust
> > devices are not "better" than using a TV adapter which relies on a
> > firmware blob.
>
> I believe they are much better, yes. They give unlimited access to
> unencrypted streams in programmatic ways in addition to exposing the
> hardware to free open source drivers and software without touching the
> OS. They have achieved an abstraction layer that I consider a good design.
>
> Perfect, and compliant with my ethics and freedom objectives, no. I made
> that clear in several ways in my posts.
>
> Have you asked them to license their firmware freely? That is what came
> up after the discussion on this thread. I don't have timne to pursue
> this. Chris or someone else could strike a deal and work with them like
> he did with QCA, I previously discussed this device with him - I doubt
> there is market for it just by seing the negative comments about pricing
> on the USB wifi device that just came out. I think it's a smart business
> decision to wait.
>
> > Not to sound offensive but such a list is useless since most likely 90
> > to 95% of the consumer devices available rely on firmware files.
>
> Actually that would be 100%. The HD Homerun device doesn't rely on
> firmware files on your PC, it already has them onboard. As such your
> system can be considered almost free (BIOS?..).
>
> Your use of "most likely" while citing statistics without sources is not
> useful, on the other hand. Please don't do that.
>
> > Devices without relying on blobs are like the needle in the haystack ;)
> > ...but I guess that is something which Chris could tell us more on his
> > search for a blob-free device.
>
> Please don't GUESS - ask him directly, or do the search yourself and
> report back here.
>
> F.
>
>
> --
> Fabián Rodríguez
> http://fsf.magicfab.ca
>
>
>

Darksoul71
Desconectado/a
se unió: 01/04/2012

@lembas: Or was this targeting me because of "suggesting" hardware which relies on non-free firmware ?

OK, then...accepted:
Pascal, do not buy any evil USB / PCI / PCIe device which relies on bad closed firmware...stick to the less flexible solution & functionality which a standard STB offers.

MagicFab
Desconectado/a
se unió: 12/13/2010

On 2013-04-30 10:00, name at domain wrote:
> Pascal, do not buy any evil USB / PCI / PCIe device which relies on bad
> closed firmware...stick to the less flexible solution & functionality
> which a standard STB offers.

Actually, I am fairly certain Chris @ ThinkPenguin found a solution for
this :) I'll let him chime in if he feels like it.

F.

--
Fabián Rodríguez
http://trisquel.magicfab.ca

Darksoul71
Desconectado/a
se unió: 01/04/2012

Fab,

thanks for answering ! I know about the firmware-free device Chris will offer. The bad point here ist that it was limited to DVB-T for Europe IIRC..and at least for Germany this means that people outside big cities will not be able to use it. I mean..even in big cities you sometimes require an active antenna below your roof to get a solid receiption (which I use for my TV).

I stick to my opinion:
Even if most blobs / firmware files are not free per definition of the FSF, a GNU Linux box running for example with a DVB-S2 USB device which requires firmware does "respect my freedom" much more than any closed box such as the name DVB-S receiver does. Especially since, while I have not(!) control about the firmware file, I have full control about the remaining 95% of the system :)

I do not endorse / promote this solution and since it is a philosophical problem, I will end here.

Most likely the best / honest answer to Pascal should have been that currently there is no free option for recording TV. At least not unless you get on hold of a device which runs without firmware files. I am quite a while with GNU Linux and own / have owned a lot of "TV devices". I can not remember one of them running without firmware.

My French is a bit rusty but as I could read Freevo relies on MythTV for recording and GeeXboX looks more like an XBMC-variant to me without recording capabilities.

Regards,
Holger

pascal@diogoantunes.org
Desconectado/a
se unió: 09/03/2012

On Wed, 1 May 2013 09:03:08 +0200 (CEST)
name at domain wrote:

> Most likely the best / honest answer to Pascal should have been that
> currently there is no free option for recording TV. At least not unless you
> get on hold of a device which runs without firmware files. I am quite a while
> with GNU Linux and own / have owned a lot of "TV devices". I can not remember
> one of them running without firmware.
>
> My French is a bit rusty but as I could read Freevo relies on MythTV for
> recording and GeeXboX looks more like an XBMC-variant to me without recording
> capabilities.
>
> Regards,
> Holger

Ok. What a pitty.

MythTV seems to be the nicest solution. Yes.
I tested GeeXboX and I confirm.

Libere,
Pascal Diogo Antunes.

--
"Si un homme a beaucoup plus qu'il ne faut, c'est que d'autres manquent
du nécessaire."- Léon Tolstoï.

pascal@diogoantunes.org
Desconectado/a
se unió: 09/03/2012

On Tue, 30 Apr 2013 10:29:30 -0400
Fabian Rodriguez <name at domain> wrote:

> On 2013-04-30 10:00, name at domain wrote:
> > Pascal, do not buy any evil USB / PCI / PCIe device which relies on bad
> > closed firmware...stick to the less flexible solution & functionality
> > which a standard STB offers.
>
> Actually, I am fairly certain Chris @ ThinkPenguin found a solution for
> this :) I'll let him chime in if he feels like it.
>
> F.
>
>
>
> --
> Fabián Rodríguez
> http://trisquel.magicfab.ca
>

Christopher Waid
Desconectado/a
se unió: 05/06/2013

> On Tue, 30 Apr 2013 10:29:30 -0400
> Fabian Rodriguez <name at domain> wrote:
>
>> On 2013-04-30 10:00, name at domain wrote:
>> > Pascal, do not buy any evil USB / PCI / PCIe device which relies on
>> bad
>> > closed firmware...stick to the less flexible solution & functionality
>> > which a standard STB offers.
>>
>> Actually, I am fairly certain Chris @ ThinkPenguin found a solution for
>> this :) I'll let him chime in if he feels like it.
>>

This is correct. We haven't got them in yet although I'm hoping to secure
the financing within a couple days to purchase a small quantity. It's on
the list of things to do. The problem is the free software friendly
chipset is discontinued so we are going to have to purchase a significant
quantity. Unfortunately there expensive, low margin, and low demand. Thus
it's not a great investment and we can't get that many (due to the high
cost). So in reality what we will get is a small quantity (probably
100-150). The dongle works with digital in both the United States and
Europe (and probably just about anywhere else for that matter).

They will probably go for $70-90 USD once we have them. Estimate
time-wise- maybe a week or two.

>> F.
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Fabián Rodríguez
>> http://trisquel.magicfab.ca
>>
>

pascal@diogoantunes.org
Desconectado/a
se unió: 09/03/2012

On Tue, 30 Apr 2013 16:00:19 +0200 (CEST)
name at domain wrote:

> @lembas: Or was this targeting me because of "suggesting" hardware which
> relies on non-free firmware ?
>
> OK, then...accepted:
> Pascal, do not buy any evil USB / PCI / PCIe device which relies on bad
> closed firmware...stick to the less flexible solution & functionality which a
> standard STB offers.

:D

Darksoul71
Desconectado/a
se unió: 01/04/2012

Wohaa, this "forum representation" of a mailing list sucks big time if a thread gets overly complicated.....

@Fab:
>Your use of "most likely" while citing statistics without sources is
>not useful, on the other hand. Please don't do that.
I am not citing statistics. This is what they call an educated guess. I have spent over 20 years with video capturing, video editing and video conversion. All this with "tons" of different devices under Windows and Linux. Thus I consider myself at least as experienced in this area.

When I write 90-95% of consumer devices, this is a positive lie at best. If we take the all the devices / models in Europe which are capable of both receiving TV broadcasts and somehow interface to an PC (satellite boxes with USB HDDs are not counted here) as 100%, then I expect less then 1% of those (may be 0.5% ?) to run without firmware. Those will be either implemented as LAN-device which streams TV channels via LAN or settop boxes with LAN / Fireware interfaces which can be controlled via a interface (Web / external library). The amount of such devices sold will be even lower than 0.5% compared to the majority of all other TV cards being sold. Most of us live in a somewhat free-market economy. Low sales = low gain = low interest to do something. It is a simple as this. No matter what I guess, estimate, evaluate or analyze.

>Please don't GUESS - ask him directly, or
>do the search yourself and report back here.
Uhm...hello ? Those who write BIG usually scream. You currently sound like my personal drill instructor.

1st: Chris is the one with the biggest experiences as manufacturer / distributor of free devices. Thus, if there would be more than one or two options for a free device capable of receiving TV signals (following the TV standards in US / Europe / ROW), we would hear this from Chris directly soon enough...for so long I will leave it with GUESSING :)

2nd: Why should I research ? Pascal asked and I answered to show the available options. I personally understand the implications of using non-free firmware on my PC as well as using the NVidia blob instead of Noveau. I do not want to endorse people to use non-free stuff but feel they should be aware of the non-free alternatives and make their own judgement.

BTW: As far as I could see the HD Homerun you have mentioned support DVB-T / DVB-C for Europe. IMO this is by far the worst combination to support.
DVB-C means you are bound to a cable provider for which you have to pay a monthly fee. DVB-T means that even in the core transmission area, you will often have a bad time receiving all available channels at good quality. Especially under worse weather conditions (strong rain / snow). DVB-t per default means less channels with lower bitrate in most mid-european countries. DVB-S2 is by far the better standard to support. More channels, better bitrates, HD channels and so on. Not supporting DVB-S2 is a dead end for the peoples on the flat country.