What makes a good community

12 respuestas [Último envío]
alimiracle
Desconectado/a
se unió: 01/18/2014

hi all
Today I found this article
http://sarah.thesharps.us/2015/10/06/what-makes-a-good-community/
I wanted to share it with you
Give me your opinion

jxself
Desconectado/a
se unió: 09/13/2010

For sure.

onpon4
Desconectado/a
se unió: 05/30/2012

I'm not exactly fond of social justice warriors trying to dictate exactly how one must behave to be a part of a "good community", or otherwise police people's behavior. And this is one of the few things I agree with Mr. Torvalds on entirely:

https://marc.info/?l=linux-kernel&m=137392506516022&w=2

kyamashita
Desconectado/a
se unió: 04/11/2014

I might or might not agree with you depending on your definition of social justice warrior.

onpon4
Desconectado/a
se unió: 05/30/2012

Social justice warriors (SJWs) are the people who complain about things that go against social justice. Usually, they're narcissists and don't actually have any strong support for any cause. They infiltrate and destroy communities, then move on to the next one. Some examples I'm familiar with are "Atheism Plus" and Anita Sarkeesian.

However, the defining characteristic of social justice warriors is advocating for social justice, which is essentially an attempt to achieve perfect equity at any cost, including trampling things like equality, fairness, and freedom (especially freedom of expression, which is what SJWs most frequently go after). In general, any problem someone has is, according to the idea of social justice, the fault of oppression. SJWs most often advocate silencing "problematic" speech that they think "oppresses" "minorities", or "triggers" people, or makes certain people uncomfortable, or something to that effect.

kyamashita
Desconectado/a
se unió: 04/11/2014

In that case I am with you. I find it ridiculous that people can still be jailed for this kind of stuff in some states. I would be considered an "oppressed minority" by SJWs and I am friends with many of these "oppressed minorities". We still dislike the amount of political correctness that we have to deal with from the SJWs in our community.

JadedCtrl
Desconectado/a
se unió: 08/11/2014

Oh god, don't remind me of Atheism Plus again...
You're triggering me, mate.

sjhsnz
Desconectado/a
se unió: 10/11/2015

So, that article linked is ok as the only mention it makes of "silencing" anyone is for repeated harassment? It seems the existing community guidelines are stricter than what is suggested in the article.

onpon4
Desconectado/a
se unió: 05/30/2012

She doesn't explicitly say that she wants to silence people or control their speech, but how exactly do you think implementing her 6-step plan for "reaching the goal of a diverse community"? One of two things is true: either she is naïve about the nature of humans, or she wants to force people to behave a particular way. Either way, suppressing speech is the only possible way to do what she suggests.

Of course, if you own a server, there's nothing wrong with having rules or guidelines regarding what kinds of things people are allowed to post there. After all, it's your server. But this woman, like other social justice warriors, has a belief that it is a moral obligation for other server owners -- like whoever owns the server(s) running the Linux developer discussion channels -- to regulate speech for her benefit. No, that isn't right. If she wants to start her own special safe space for people like her who just can't take the environment run by Mr. Torvalds et al, she can make it herself.

Additionally, if she gets her way, it will not end there. She will claim victory, but then she will claim that there is another problem that needs to be solved, again, inevitably by authoritarian means. Because this isn't actually about a community. It's about her. And as long as she blames problems she has on the community, rather than e.g. growing a thicker skin like the rest of us, it will never be satisfactory.

So no, what she is advocating is not right. Any community which tries to embrace her ideas will only suffer harm. Of course, that doesn't mean it's wrong for her to express her views; to say otherwise would be something an SJW would do, and that would be too ironic.

JadedCtrl
Desconectado/a
se unió: 08/11/2014

I wish I could upvote this more than once.

sjhsnz
Desconectado/a
se unió: 10/11/2015

Woah... I certainly don't like the sound of the imaginary villain you've constructed.

Garsmith
Desconectado/a
se unió: 07/27/2013

Improvement can be done here. Maybe not as extreme as that post says but some from it can sure be implemented. Maybe combine it with a forum update for future Trisquel 8?

https://trisquel.info/en/forum/modernizing-trisquel-forums

Larissa

I am a member!

Desconectado/a
se unió: 07/12/2014

Many points are important and should be a good goal. But some are, to be honest just strange...

I my self was bullied in school, later got to a inclusive school (for disabilities and non-disabilities). I know many points, and know how important they can be (Up to Level2).

The Constantly important things in my opinions are:

Repeat harassers are removed from conferences and banned from communication channels (At least until they better them self)
Newbies are warned about any “missing stairs” and people who give unhelpful feedback (I think no newbie has to get misinformed)
The whole community, including leadership and community managers actively enforce communication standards
Documentation on where to interact with the community (irc, mailing list, bug tracker, etc)
Documented first steps for compiling, running, testing, and polishing contributions
Step-by-step tutorials, which are kept up-to-date
How to give back non-code contributions (bug reports, docs, tutorials, testing, event planning, graphical design)
Newbie todo lists
Community creates a casual feedback channel for generating ideas with newcomers (irc, mailing list, slack, whatever works)
Community members write tutorials on the art of patch review, release management, and the social side of software development
Constantly improves documentation
Conferences include child care, clearly labeled veggie and non-veggie foods, and a clear event policy (Yes I know that childcare can be difficult but it could help)
Community participates in diversity programs (So we can lern from the "others")