Proptietary nonsense

33 réponses [Dernière contribution]
Jaret
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 12/19/2018

Today I've been visiting my sister at her house. Her son was so busy playing a video game so he even refused to attend to a dinner with us. I decided to gain more information about that game and what's so interesting about it. Turns out it's just some mindless turn based BS. Maybe I'm too old to understand videogames. By what was really interesting about that game is it's proprietary EULA.
https://store.steampowered.com//eula/262060_eula_0
Oh, my! Not only data collection, but also "When you are using the Game, the Game may monitor your computer’s random access memory (RAM) for unauthorized third-party programs <...> You hereby consent to this monitoring."
I'm not sure if I should be laughing or crying after reading that EULA. (I was laughing for some reason:)

boba
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 08/28/2017

You are right, better laugh about it. It can only improve your general well-being.

Crying about it would only add one extra undesirable effect to that EULA.

Masaru Suzuqi
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 06/06/2018

> I'm not sure if I should be laughing or crying after reading that EULA.

You should slap his face and take the game away from him. It is an education. I don't think a man who can do nothing with even his nephew can do something with others.

> Turns out it's just some mindless turn based BS. Maybe I'm too old to understand videogames.

When I was a kid, I was enthusiastic about Super Mario Bros (1985). It was really fun. The question is whether there is something difference in the quality of enjoyment between what we had with those good games and what he and others have with those BS.

boba
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 08/28/2017

> When I was a kid, I was enthusiastic about Super Mario Bros (1985). It was really fun.

Until someone slapped your face and took the game away from you, that is.

Masaru Suzuqi
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 06/06/2018

If someone gave me the slap, I would not have lived such a miserable life.

boba
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 08/28/2017

Someone could have introduced you to SuperTux or SuperTuxKart. That way you would have been able to live a libre miserable life.

andyprough
En ligne
A rejoint: 02/12/2015

>You should slap his face and take the game away from him. It is an education. I don't think a man who can do nothing with even his nephew can do something with others.

Slap him? In Texas we would put him in jail for at least 30 years. And not some comfortable jail - one where you have to break great big rocks with a sledge hammer every day in 100 degrees Fahrenheit heat, with no water to drink. That's how you treat children who want to play video games.

(I'm laughing envisioning Masaru writing that slap post on his iPhone)

nadebula.1984
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 05/01/2018

iPhone is not necessarily bad. One of my friends uses a very old iPhone, with bootloader unlocked using certain security exploit.

andyprough
En ligne
A rejoint: 02/12/2015

Not bad but it is still funny to me.

Masaru Suzuqi
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 06/06/2018

Maybe my uncle should slap me. Then if he was sentenced to thirty years in prison, became a macho, I would never use iPhone. But iPhone is convenient anyway...
I heard that the police officer who stomped someone's throat and killed him will be sentenced to three years in prison.
Then if you slapped a child, will you be in jail for thirty years? It seems something wrong with the US.

andyprough
En ligne
A rejoint: 02/12/2015

> Maybe my uncle should slap me. Then if he was sentenced to thirty years in prison, became a macho, I would never use iPhone.

I need your uncle to slap me so I stop using GPS. Your uncle could become quite useful. Anytime one of us became addicted to a non-free or privacy-violating device or software, he could slap us until we stop.

boba
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 08/28/2017

> That's how you treat children who want to play video games.

> Maybe my uncle should slap me.

I was under the impression that Andy was referring to you, or to Jaret's nephew, being sent to jail, not to the respective slapping uncle. Under Texas law you would not only have been slapped, but also sent to forced labor.

Under the current deviant Huttese laws, the reverse might indeed happen, so the slapping uncles would actually be making a huge personal sacrifice in order to get their respective nephews back on the right track.

Slapping uncles are the last hope of software freedom, let's build a slapping uncle automaton.

Masaru Suzuqi
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 06/06/2018

I am confused. Maybe I am in kind of a slump or I just have no much motivation anymore, for anything. I think I should eat popcorn for a while this time really. Thank you.

andyprough
En ligne
A rejoint: 02/12/2015

> let's build a slapping uncle automaton

Already been built: https://invidious.snopyta.org/watch?v=M0bYrK07qYg

boba
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 08/28/2017

Great!

Let's get a working GPLed version and call it "Uncle", "Auntie" or "Sibling of parents" instead of "Daddy" in order to ward off trademark, patent and inclusiveness issues at once.

Masaru Suzuqi
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 06/06/2018

Ideally, we should sell it under $100. People would not buy if it was $200.

andyprough
En ligne
A rejoint: 02/12/2015

Get your Uncle Slap-happy robot for only $99.99!! AND, get a second one for FREE, just pay another $99.99 for shipping and handling!

boba
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 08/28/2017

This does absolutely make sense: get two Slappie-Auntie Bots and watch them slap each other until they both switch to GPL.

Be aware you will be next, so be prepared.

boba
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 08/28/2017

> we should sell it under $100

I don't know. I have always been bad at pricing. Pricing theory is very interesting but practicing it seems to require a hell lot of experience.

When I sold my brain at 4.60€ I really thought I was getting a great deal. That thought came out of a weak brain, of course. But then it only makes sense for a weak brain to be sold at a low price. So maybe a full cabbage for my brain was actually good bargain. You see, pricing is very tricky.

I would suggest Dutch auctions so we would discover the real reserve price of our customers without having to slap them first.

Jaret
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 12/19/2018

> You should slap his face and take the game away from him.
My sister complains her son is spending too much time playing video games. Despite that, she bought him new gaming computer on his last birthday. I think her son's education is her own business.

Masaru Suzuqi
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 06/06/2018

Psychological speaking, it is obviously unnatural to refuse to attend to even the dinner even if how he is enthusiastic at the game, isn't it? So my guess is that he did want to attend to the dinner, but he pretended that he had no interest in having salmon for dinner with his uncle who he rarely meets. I mean, he wanted to be slapped by you, and to be taken the game away from himself and expected you to tell him off and say that something like "You should attend to the dinner when I visit your home!... bla bla bla... this is my love!, this is an education!...". You misunderstood his thought. You started to read the EURA instead of slapping him. Your nephew would have disappointed at your action. Of course education might be your sister's business but each position has its own task. I feel that you are too indifferent to your nephew. If you still are in the home, I recommend you to slap him as soon as possible. It is not too late. I was going to eat popcorn for my sake but I am writing this for your nephew's and your own sakes.

nadebula.1984
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 05/01/2018

I don't think that there would be many players who really read through the EULA, or even care it.

Back to 1986, it was the "Computer Fraud and Abuse Act" (CFAA) enabled proprietary software developers to write their own EULA which was legally binding on the users.

Likewise, the DMCA enabled the proprietary software developers and media publishers to write their own copyright laws.

andyprough
En ligne
A rejoint: 02/12/2015

In the 1990s in America, Microsoft had formed the "Business Software Alliance", who was basically the Microsoft police force. They would accuse businesses of running Windows without a paid license and force the businesses to pay huge fines and penalties.

nadebula.1984
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 05/01/2018

Copyright, patent, and EULA (or Terms of Use, etc.) are three different issues, covered by different laws.

BSA was a copyright enforcement entity. It became possible in the wake of 1976 Copyright Act.

But what this proprietary game does is to scan user's memory for "non-authorized" programs (e.g. cheater program), and this doesn't necessarily involve copyright infringement (if the user has purchased the license legally).

In such case, the developer needs another law to punish such activity, and this law is CFAA, which puhishes any usage of program that the developer doesn't wish. In short, copyright laws don't restrict the ways in which a user uses a program.

boba
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 08/28/2017

> Copyright, patent, and EULA (or Terms of Use, etc.) are three different issues, covered by different laws.

Thanks for pointing to this, it made me realize that in my mind EULA, restrictive software licences (in the sense of not being GPL) and copyright were blurred into one thing.

I will need to read more on their respective implications, because I have a feeling that restrictive EULAs are only possible on top of restrictive software licences, but this might not necessarily be true.

I also found that GameStation inserted this 2010 April Fool's joke somewhere in the middle of their EULA:

"By placing an order via this Web site on the first day of the fourth month of the year 2010 Anno Domini, you agree to grant Us a non transferable option to claim, for now and for ever more, your immortal soul. Should We wish to exercise this option, you agree to surrender your immortal soul, and any claim you may have on it, within 5 (five) working days of receiving written notification from gamesation.co.uk or one of its duly authorised minions."

"We reserve the right to serve such notice in 6 (six) foot high letters of fire, however we can accept no liability for any loss or damage caused by such an act. If you a) do not believe you have an immortal soul, b) have already given it to another party, or c) do not wish to grant Us such a license, please click the link below to nullify this sub-clause and proceed with your transaction."

It reminded me of the EULA of a well known instant messaging and calling application, which might have been the first EULA I did read from beginning to end just after it changed ownership. I should have read it long before, of course, but the hellish slap I got while reading it was enough to wake me up for good on the topic.

boba
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 08/28/2017

I hope the April 1st 2010 version of the GameStation EULA was not too strictly copyrighted.

Jaret
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 12/19/2018

> I don't think that there would be many players who really read through the EULA, or even care it.
That's the problem with proprietary software. A lot of people don't bother to read EULAs.

boba
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 08/28/2017

I agree.

From there, we can only conclude that people are the problem.

Hence the necessity of the slapping machine.

Jaret
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 12/19/2018

Machine is dump, we need smart humans to slap properly. These guys:
https://www.invidio.us/watch?v=cd7D9Rl_kZ4

boba
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 08/28/2017

My guess was that only machines might resist the temptation of selling their soul to the highest bidder.

You said these people are already putting their health on the line for anything between nothing and $1,600.

Jaret
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 12/19/2018

If they get a draw, it's $800 for both of them. Slapping machine should be librebooted, you don't want any Management Engine to interfere with slapping process.

Masaru Suzuqi
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 06/06/2018

I think both of you are confused. It seems that maybe only I realized this that the slapping machine must chase the owner until it slaps the owner when its owners violated. It must keep watch on its owners. To avoid litigation due to malfunction (slapping a wrong person, etc), and because it is impractical to develop and market a high performance slapping robot which is equipped with surveillance and tracking system for under $100, hiring watchers would be a practical way. The resource though, I think we should first sentence to life imprisonment for all criminals who committed felony, seriously. Then we should have them do the surveillance to remotely monitor people from prison with the slapping robot. So you do not have to libreboot the robot, you can take advantage of any Management Engine to track and slap GPL offenders as nadebura points out.

boba
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 08/28/2017

TLDR but you might have been eating too much popcorn by now.

boba
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 08/28/2017

> Slapping machine should be librebooted, you don't want any Management Engine to interfere with slapping process.

I was on the verge of writing that I fully agree with you, but I just changed my mind.

Let's create a slapping robot apocalypse and see who's the winner, that will be much more fun to watch.