Play games like 'Dying Light' on Trisquel

16 respuestas [Último envío]
Alejandro Hernández
Desconectado/a
se unió: 02/11/2016

I have Windows installed only because of videogames.

Is there a way to play new games on Trisquel?

Thanks. ;)

Mr_Haze305
Desconectado/a
se unió: 05/12/2013

Not without proprietary software.

This topic has been brought so many times, please use the search feature next time.

SuperTramp83

I am a translator!

Desconectado/a
se unió: 10/31/2014

>I have Windows installed only because of videogames.

Is there a way to play new games on Trisquel?

sure, Winehq. Proprietary games are proprietary software, so that's bad. Also, if I had to make a wild guess I'd say out of 5 games, on Wine 1 will work perfectly fine, 1 will be barely playable, 3 won't even install/start. That was my experience with wine last time I used it.
Proprietary software is always a bad thing and you should avoid it, games included. Anyway, Wine is certainly better than the Steam malware the open source boyz seem to be so much fond of..

t3g
t3g
Desconectado/a
se unió: 05/15/2011

If you REALLY have to play this game and others, you could always just dual boot between Trisquel and Windows and only boot into Windows when you have to play a game. For every day usage (looking at porn, writing code, emailing your grandmother), just stick to the Trisquel boot.

moxalt
Desconectado/a
se unió: 06/19/2015

> looking at porn ... emailing to your grandmother

That juxtaposition though.

Alejandro Hernández
Desconectado/a
se unió: 02/11/2016

Thanks. So, there is no way to obligate to liberate the code of these games after a couple of years or something?

how many years last their patents?

thank you.

Free Software. Free people. :)

onpon4
Desconectado/a
se unió: 05/30/2012

> Thanks. So, there is no way to obligate to liberate the code of these games after a couple of years or something?

No. There is no law requiring anyone to publish source code to anything.

> how many years last their patents?

Video games are not typically patented. They are copyrighted. Copyright is fundamentally different from patents.

Copyright monopolies in the U.S. last until 70 years after the death of the author. In the case of anonymous works, pseudonymous works, and works made for hire, the term is instead 95 years after publication or 120 years after creation, whichever is shorter. So the effective answer is "forever". No work which was created during your lifetime is a work you are ever going to see enter the public domain. In fact, no work which was created during your parents' lifetime is likely to be a work you are ever going to see enter the public domain. And that's assuming the copyright industry doesn't purchase yet another retroactive copyright term extension.

Alejandro Hernández
Desconectado/a
se unió: 02/11/2016

But, if we make a law to obligate them to publish source code to everything (after a few years) in a country (like Spain), they must do it, right?

Magic Banana

I am a member!

Desconectado/a
se unió: 07/24/2010

Such a law would be great. But the current legislative world (lobbied by large corporations) is light-centuries away from such a law. Instead, it extends the copyright terms over and over again. And even if proprietary software would ever end up in the public domain, there would be no obligation to publish the source code (under current laws): pretty useless. You could not even study it, remove its malware, etc.

Alejandro Hernández
Desconectado/a
se unió: 02/11/2016

It is unnaceptable. If they want to sell something into our countries, they must liberate the code as later as five? years.

It is very important to demand all into free software. We have to do this.

We are very slow.

hack and hack
Desconectado/a
se unió: 04/02/2015

It's maybe possible, based on some Quake engine, to create a similar game.

Of course it's a lot more work, and the graphic aspect might be a few decades late, but after all, at it's core, it's a similar type of game.

Calinou
Desconectado/a
se unió: 03/08/2014

It doesn't have to be something based on the Quake engine (most iterations of that engine have important shortcomings that are very hard to fix). Better use something like Godot.

Not to mention you will be way more productive in an engine that provides a visual editor and high-level scripting.

hack and hack
Desconectado/a
se unió: 04/02/2015

I suppose, yes. The idea was more about reusing the Quake game itself, which I assume shares basic functionalities with modern games like the latest fallouts, Skyrim or Dying Light (first person. Not open world though, and not survival horror either. But it's 1/3 already done).

Maybe a fork of openarena can be written with Godot.

onpon4
Desconectado/a
se unió: 05/30/2012

That would be a clone, not a fork. And what would be the point?

hack and hack
Desconectado/a
se unió: 04/02/2015

Of course a clone is pointless. I mean to use it as a base and ADD a different gameplay (survival horror, open world), and thus making a completely different game.

onpon4
Desconectado/a
se unió: 05/30/2012

You can't use OpenArena as a base for something written in Godot. How do you expect that to work? OpenArena is written in C. I guess you could go through all the C source code and copy the exact functionality of OpenArena into a new Godot project, but at that point, why not just start over from scratch? Why meticulously copy all of OpenArena's particular quirks into a Godot project when you can just start from scratch and get a better result in less effort, or keep it in C if you really want to use OpenArena as a base?

hack and hack
Desconectado/a
se unió: 04/02/2015

In that case, maybe there's already an existing libre quake-like game made with Godot that could serve as a base.
If not, it's probably better to start from scratch.
I guess C is probably better performance-wise, but it's much harder to write with.