Back-up

8 réponses [Dernière contribution]
Piriponzolo
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 02/19/2016

Hi to everyone. I have to install an SSD on a netbook ASUS Eee PC, what back-up program can I use in order to maintain Trisquel mini 8 Flidas? Thank you for the attention.

FindEssential
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 08/23/2017

I'm going to assume you are one of the lucky Eee owners that has a model with a ssd not soldered to the main board. But, if you haven't checked that I would do that first.

After that, what you actually want to do is clone your hard drive. This can be done with dd, though there are other options like Gparted or Clonezilla. I just happen to use dd. Here is a link providing a good overview of the process: https://www.howtogeek.com/howto/19141/clone-a-hard-drive-using-an-ubuntu-live-cd/

Piriponzolo
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 02/19/2016

Yes, I was lucky to find the old sata HDD not soldered. Thank you. Ciao

PublicLewdness
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 03/15/2020

As for software I use Back In Time to backup data as well as a manual copy/paste for small stuff. I use Timeshift for system settings. I also take clone images using Redo Backup.

Piriponzolo
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 02/19/2016

Thank you. All OK

muhammed
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 04/13/2013

Hi -- hope that no one minds if I ask my question about back ups here

I have Trisquel 9 now. I used Deja-dup when I had Trisquel 8 Mini. Does Back In Time have incremental backup? I want to backup regularly (and hopefully automatically) and I would rather not make a full snapshot backup every time.

I wish to back up my external harddrive (and maybe to a second one, once in a while, just to be safe). These external harddrives are formatted as FAT ... which Back In Time does not seem to like (Back In Time said that FAT doesn't support hard links ... I don't know what that means other than that FAT won't work).

Magic Banana

I am a member!

Hors ligne
A rejoint: 07/24/2010

With Back In Time, files that are unchanged between two consecutive backups are hard links: different paths leading to a same file, stored only once. The filesystem type of the backup location must therefore support hard links. FAT does not. NTFS does and so do all filesystems you encounter on GNU/Linux, BSD, etc.

muhammed
Hors ligne
A rejoint: 04/13/2013

Thank you MB! I'm going to move all my material onto backup drive 2, so that I can reformat backup drive 1 as NTFS or ext4 (?). I and then I'll do the same for backup drive 2. Is there a file system that you would recommend for a backup drive?

Magic Banana

I am a member!

Hors ligne
A rejoint: 07/24/2010

With NTFS, you can plug the drive on a Windows system and access the files you backed up. If you do not plan to do that, ext4 is usually considered the most reliable filesystem type, what matters most for backup. That said, in my experience, XFS is very reliable too (Trisquel has been using it by default for /home for many years). It is supposeed to be more efficient for large files such as those typically backed up (several MB is already "large").