On the Topic Release Schedule

20 Antworten [Letzter Beitrag]
rwilkerson1000
Offline
Beigetreten: 03/17/2012

I love Trisquel as it is a great Free Software alternative to ubuntu. That's also why I loved gNewSense.

When I first entered into this world, I did so through the side door. I was first an 'open source' ubuntu 'linux' user. Later I realized the deeper history of this community; the Free Software Movement and the work of Richard Stallman.

After learning this, I decided to see myself as a Free Software GNU/Linux user. With that, I wanted a completely Free Software operating system.

gNewSense was the first one that I found. In finding it, I soon got frustrated at the fact that it was so old and out of date. It's still very old and out of date. I hear a new version is being worked on. Though, I've been hearing that for some time now.

An old operating system is an inconvenience and a risk.

A security issue, as newer programs also have newer security updates.

An inconvenience because everything is harder than it should be. New versions of software (tools and video games) depend a newer libraries to work at all. This is especially true for video games and multimedia software (especially video editing.) Compiling from source, or even installing from deb packages, becomes a nightmare on dependency hell street. Something as simple as installing a video game becomes a multiple hour, painful, task.

A lot of these libs are deeply rooted in the os. This means that each dependency will typically have a long line of dependencies itself. It's not uncommon at all to have to install five, seven, or more dep packages. All packages that I have to download from the debian or ubuntu package server; assuming all the while that (hopefully) they are still all Freedom Respecting Packages sense the old program in Trisquel was freedom respecting.

I remember, at one point, a package changed its name from the version in gNewSense. You would have thought that the sky had fallen. gNewSense didn't have a new package to tell the system to switch to the new name. I think the program was lib-cup-sys or something like that. The game didn't even need it for printing, but it needed another program that needed it. I tried to force the newer deb packages to install; but then I think that they needed a new libc6. Now I have to manually install a libc library from a deb package?!? When I tried to uninstall the old one, it uninstalled almost the entire os because almost everything in the os depended on libc. I wanted to scream. All I wanted to do was install a simple little video game. A simple, 2D video game. But, the game needed a newer versions of programs/libs that needed a new libcups, that needed a new libc6; which I couldn't figure out how to update manually.

The point is, I shouldn't have had to update anything manually because the os (in this case gNewSense) should have updated to being based off of a newer version of ubuntu.

This is the reason I switched from gNewSense to Trisquel. Trisquel, at that time, kept up to date with ubuntu releases. They were only somewhere between one to three months off. Which, honestly, wasn't that bad.

However, Trisquel has gone astray on this. Currently, in odd irony, I'm having problems installing a newest version of 2D game. (I think maybe the same game as back then.) As being one of two os distros based on ubuntu that are entirely Free Software, there are not a lot of other options. I have to think that I might be having better luck should Trisquel be newer. I know that all the newest updates to programs aren’t instant in any os distro; but at least they are updated once every six months.

Even when Version 6 comes out, it will be horrifically out of date. I'm personally able to manage on some level, as I have been running GNU/Linux systems for several years. Yet, I have to wonder how troubling this could be for people switching from ubuntu to Triquesl. Or, even harder, from windows to Trisquel. When I first went from windows to ubuntu, ease of use was helpful. That's why I chose ubuntu, at that time, over others GNU/Linux operating systems.

Trisquel 6 is based on ubuntu 12.04. This isn't even the newest version of ubuntu, it hasn't been for a long time. It was released way back in April! It's still supported, but not even the current version. By the time Trisquel 6 finally comes out, we'll all already be at least one 6month release cycle behind. If it takes four more months, we'll be two cycles behind. How close is Trisquel 6? I haven’t heard anything significant about it in a long time.

When this point has been brought up time and again, two answers arise.

1: 'We don't have enough money from contributors to get our distributions out fast enough.'
2: 'Keeping up with ubuntu really isn't a goal anymore. (I think it used to be.)' As such, what is being said here is that all of the security fixes, bug fixes, new features, and convenience of newer versions of basically all of the software are being seen as 'not really a big deal.'

Here is what I don't understand though. I might be wrong here, as I'm not a programmer. Though, from my understanding, one wouldn't really have to be for this project most of the time.

From my understanding, how I see it, Trisquel should only take a week at most to get a new version out after a new ubuntu.

All Trisquel really has to be is unbutu with different names, different logos, non-free software uninstalled, and a linux-libre kernel installed.

When a new linux kernel comes out, there is a Linux Libre Kernel in a matter of days. Same exact thing with GNU/Icecat. Every time we get a new firefox, GNU/Icecat comes out with a new version in days.

From my understanding, this is because they know what needs to changed/deleted and have formulated a script for doing just that. As such, all they need to do is download the program, run the script, and publish the Free Software version.

Why does Trisquel not do this? Why is there no simple script that can be run to change logos, change names, delete non-free programs, and install the Linux Libre Kernel?

Now, I understand that keeping the 2D option after the newest version of ubunut took extra work and extra time. But, outside of large changes like this being done, why is Trisquel taking months instead of days or a week?

From my understanding, and again I could be wrong, Trisquel is working on a lot of custom changes to the os that they do on their own; in addition to liberating ubuntu.

Does it really take months to delete packages and change logos in names? Or, could this be done quicker/made into a script?

I don't need a lot of extra changes. All I'm looking for is an os that is a liberated ubuntu that keeps up as quick as possible with ubuntu releases.

Has the priority of these extra changes been placed ahead of the priority of keeping up with ubuntu? Is keeping up with ubuntu even a priority here? If not, it's sad, as I do not then know of any Free Software liberated ubuntu that keeps up with ubuntu.

Is there a compromise that could be reached here? Maybe release a bare-bones Trisquel that is just a liberated ubuntu as soon as possible; and then work on the custom Trisquel changes and add them through the update manager as they come along over the months. Why should the entire os be put on hold for changes I may not really need/want? Am I the only one that feels this way?

It's not that the custom changes are not nice. It's just that by the time they reach us, the entire os is already obsolete by one, almost two, release cycles.

Luther
Offline
Beigetreten: 12/11/2010

To address your immediate problem:

You could try out Parabola, a rolling release, all-free distro. It takes a significant amount of work to install, and it requires some occasional maintenance to keep it in working order, but you'll always have the latest software.

You could also get the Trisquel 6.0 alpha from http://devel.trisquel.info/makeiso/iso/. The latest image is from 2012-12-1.

I agree that it's frustrating to have to wait so long for new software. Here's the situation as I understand it:

quidam, the project leader, has a day job. He can't afford to work on Trisquel full time.

I assume it requires some manual labor to pass on updates from Ubuntu to the Trisquel repo. This means that the faster he releases a new Trisquel, the more time he has to spend on updates.

I remember quidam saying sometime in the past that he waits 3 months after the Ubuntu release before he does any work at all on the next Trisquel. This gives Ubuntu a chance to fix the major bugs so he has a more stable distro to work with.

If anyone else knows more than I do, feel free to chime in.

Chris

I am a member!

Offline
Beigetreten: 04/23/2011

Become a member!

Become a member!

Become a member!

Sorry. I had to get that out. The message just doesn't seem to be getting across so I have to scream louder. That said though Trisquel is really not that far behind Ubuntu. It is about one release behind. 6 is right around the corner: http://trisquel.info/en/wiki/roadmap

Certainly it would be nice if the project could hire a full time developer (like the lead developer!). That isn't happening though without your financial support. It's a really simple problem to solve. Just not enough people willing to make that commitment.

Ohh- and yes- it is time consuming to get a release out consistently when you have other priorities and commitments that come first.

moilami
Offline
Beigetreten: 09/17/2012

From http://trisquel.info/en/wiki/roadmap

vrms

Description: Purports to tell you about nonfree software on your system.
Problem: Incomplete, misleading, and not necessary for distributions that
abide by the GFSD
Recommended Fix: Remove program/package
(Source) package name(s): vrms
Trisquel Status: Fixed (Package removed)

Man, this is so bad.

VRMS is Free Software. There is no reason to remove it just because it uses Debian's definition of Free Software.

For me Free Speech is 1 000 000 more important than Free Software. Removing vrms is outrageous attack against Free Speech.

Time to go back to Debian GNU/Linux or Parabola GNU/Linux, I guess.

Magic Banana

I am a member!

Offline
Beigetreten: 07/24/2010

Free speech has nothing to do with forcing distributions to propose all free software (what Debian and Parabola do not do either). Actually, I would even argue in the opposite way: every GNU/Linux distribution must be free to select whatever package they want. Notice that your stance would also entail that "not proposing proprietary software is against freedom of speech".

By the way, notice that the package name means "Virtual rms" although it does not represent rms' opinions on what is free/unfree. In particular, vrms reports the GNU FDL documentation as unfree! I agree with the Trisquel project that it is "misleading". If the package name would represent rms' opinions, its implementation in Trisquel's repository would take one Shell line (and would be pointless):
echo 'No non-free package installed. rms would be proud.'

moilami
Offline
Beigetreten: 09/17/2012

It is an attack against free speech because the views are different between Debian and GNU. Different view of free software is not allowed by Trisquel if the package is removed.

A distro can of course select what packages it includes. But in this case additional work has been done to /exclude/ a package just because it uses debian guidelines for free software.

There are reasons why VRMS reports GNU FDL docs as non-free.

http://people.debian.org/~srivasta/Position_Statement.xhtml#problems

However, there is no reason to exclude VRMS.

VRMS is not pointless because it is a good joke. Also, VRMS could be developed to behave in a little bit same way as "your-freedom" package in Parabola.

Trisquel repos being free does not mean that the user of Trisquel would automatically use free software. Users can install software from some other places, and after that they can check does VRMS think their system is free. For example, I have heard people using Ubuntu PPAs in Trisquel, and I do it myself.

Magic Banana

I am a member!

Offline
Beigetreten: 07/24/2010

Yes, Debian and GNU have different views... but why would they be forced to express views they do not share?! Parabola's views are in agreement with the "your-freedom" package (which incidentally are GNU's too, not Debian's).

Do you also complain that GNU "censors" distributions by only listing the ones they approve? Am I censoring most GNU/Linux distributions because I decided not to cite them in my post (and so do you)? I could easily reach the Godwin point by switching topic... :-)

The freedom of speech is the freedom to express one's opinions and certainly not the obligation to express other's opinions! You can take any dictionary you want to check. For instance:
the right of people to express *their* opinions publicly without governmental interference, subject to the laws against libel, incitement to violence or rebellion, etc.

Besides, you do not understand what the misnamed 'vrms' package does: it only checks from what Debian repository a package comes from. It is perfectly useless to know the "freedom status" of software installed from PPA or compiled by hand.

t3g
t3g
Offline
Beigetreten: 05/15/2011

There are PPAs for everyday use that only have free software like LibreOffice at https://launchpad.net/~libreoffice/+archive/ppa or GNU at https://launchpad.net/~dns/+archive/gnu

For my development, I also rely on the Git PPA at https://launchpad.net/~git-core/+archive/ppa and the nginx PPA: https://launchpad.net/~nginx/+archive/stable which are also excellent free software packages.

sphynx
Offline
Beigetreten: 11/30/2011
From http://trisquel.info/en/wiki/roadmap

No. It's from http://libreplanet.org/wiki/Software_blacklist#vrms, which points to https://lists.gnu.org/archive/html/gnewsense-users/2007-02/msg00027.html as reference.

It is an attack against free speech because the views are different between Debian and GNU. Different view of free software is not allowed by Trisquel if the package is removed.

Let's recall some concepts here.

Free Speech is your right to propagate your ideas without interference. (There is restrictions on that, for example, in Brazil, the apology to crime.) This doesn't mean other people has to provide you means for doing that, or that anyone is obliged to listen to you.

The difference of views is not something that can be allowed or forbidden. It happens. What also "happen" is that Trisquel is commited to FSF's Guidelines for Free System Distributions, and vrms is commited to Debian's, which appears to conflict with FSF's in some points, which makes the use of vrms in Trisquel by an unaware user misleading.

Also, it's misleading because it misuses RMS name; his points of view differ from those obviously.

A distro can of course select what packages it includes. But in this case additional work has been done to /exclude/ a package just because it uses debian guidelines for free software.

Well, it wasn't even included at the first place. Even if it was, the only work it takes to remove and blacklist it is a few commands.

And it is not blacklisted just because it uses Debian's guidelines. It is because it is incomplete, misleading and unnecessary (sic).

There are reasons why VRMS reports GNU FDL docs as non-free. (link)

1. I didn't read that draft, but it appears to be about GNU FDL 1.2 (dated 2002). The last version is 1.3 (dated 2008): https://www.gnu.org/licenses/fdl.html

2. Even if there are reasons Debian folks call it "non-free", Trisquel doesn't abide to their views, but to FSF's ones, which... See: https://www.gnu.org/philosophy/common-distros.html#Debian

[...] VRMS is not pointless because it is a good joke. [...]

Then what you are saying is not much pointless too. But it's not a good joke...

[...] Also, VRMS could be developed to behave in a little bit same way as "your-freedom" package in Parabola. [...]

your-freedom is a blacklist, just like the one where you got that about vrms, which, as Banana pointed out, just checks from which Debian repo the thing came. So, Parabola doesn't ship it too: https://parabolagnulinux.org/packages/?q=vrms

Trisquel repos being free does not mean that the user of Trisquel would automatically use free software. [...]

Yes, it means, because to use Trisquel is to "automatically" use Trisquel repositories, from which Trisquel is conveyed.

SirGrant

I am a member!

I am a translator!

Offline
Beigetreten: 07/27/2010

Ok, I'm going to try to break down why I think your argument is very logically flawed.

Your first premise: It is an attack against free speech because the views are different between Debian and GNU.

Your reasoning: Different view of free software is not allowed by Trisquel if the package is removed.

Flaw: Free speech is the political idea that one has the right to communicate their ideas and opinions. By one project simply having a different view compared to another project is not attacking free speech. They still have the right to their opinion and are able to communicate it. The trisquel project does not censor debian in any way or their opinions. Yes, the package is removed but that is because this project agrees with the GNU philosophy. So we don't happen to provide software that uses the Debian philosophy. That is not an attack on freedom of speech. It would only be such if the Trisquel project attempted to censor or prevent the debian project from holding or communicating their opinion.

Your second premise: However, there is no reason to exclude VRMS.

My disagreement: I can think of multiple reasons to not include VRMS.

1) As you mentioned VRMS follows the Debian free software philosophy. This project does not. That is not a secret. If you wish to use software that follows the Debian software philosophy you can use Debian. If you wish to follow the GNU philosophy try Trisquel or Parabola

2) The description "it is misleading" is true. Because as pointed out there are philosophical differences. If you subscribe to the GNU free software philosophy then the GFDL is compatible with a free system. VRMS may mark such content as non-free which according to our philosphy is inaccurate. Secondly, Debian considers the Artistic License 1.0 to be free while the GNU project does not. So if a user installed a program under the Artistic License 1.0 such as Simutrans VRMS would not detect that non-free software on their computer. So the software can mislead users if they are trying to follow the GNU project guidelines. Yes, as you mention we could modify VRMS to suit our views but that would require developer time and isn't a high priority. Users using Trisquel can already be confident they are using all free software unless they install it from other sources like PPAs as you mention. If you do that you should be aware of what you are installing.

Also even with my disagreement if you still feel the way you do feel free to host your own repository. You could mirror the Trisquel repo and simply add VRMS. The Trisquel project is privately operated so they can host whatever software they want. The choice to exclude any software is not attacking freedom of speech. It is a choice. The same way you can make the choice to share VRMS with as many people as you want if you wish. It is up to you.

moilami
Offline
Beigetreten: 09/17/2012

To the OP: sounds very familiar. I was also a linux user, then found out about FSF, argued with Finnish Linux users should it be GNU/Linux or just Linux, stopped using Gentoo because of a message RMS posted to Gentoo mailing lists, used BLAG GNU/Linux, used gNewSense, was unable to use gNewSense because X4500HD Intel graphics were unsupported, used Trisquel GNU/Linux, used Kongoni GNU/Linux, used Parabola GNU/Linux, and now again using Trisquel GNU/Linux.

Like someone said, Parabola is a good thing to try, especially if you want to play libre games. I don't use it because there is always very strange bugs with gthumb, namely, it doesn't show my RAW files correctly. Last time I also got bored in trying to get photo import from a camera to work on Parabola GNU/Linux. Other than that it has been a great distro and in my opinion by far the best libre distro.

It seems that Trisquel's strategy is to become funded for full-time development libre distro with the cost of ignoring volunteer help at this poing. Hope it works.

Chris

I am a member!

Offline
Beigetreten: 04/23/2011

Rubén hasn't ignored the volunteers who want to help. We haven't presented anything to him. The volunteers who want to help may actually slow things down too. Consider this for a moment.

Throwing an additional 100 developers on a project doesn't necessarily speed it up. This is exactly what an inexperienced leader would do in the business world.

"Ignoring" the forums is actually a good thing if Rubén is going to get things out on time. Let other people help / answer questions. It is a much more efficient means of getting things done.

This does not mean that volunteers can't be of any help. I believe people have contacted Rubén about adding people to help with translations. He has added them. He has made some good points about why he doesn't want to add languages yet. His answer was to find additional people to help translate. The reason is you don't want the information to become out of date. There is a certain level of professionalism here.

jdenz
Offline
Beigetreten: 11/18/2011

"It seems that Trisquel's strategy is to become funded for full-time development libre distro with the cost of ignoring volunteer help at this poing. Hope it works."

I wonder if someone could set up a Free Software version of something like a Kickstarter campagin for Trisquel? I think the donation problem is a chicken/egg problem. For me, I don't want to donate randomly, I'd rather donate to a plan that folks want to work on ... like keeping up with Ubuntu, for instance. I'd donate to a plan that enabled that to happen. I think even if volunteer help was accepted, it might still be helpful to have paid folks guiding things and moving things along.

"Is there a compromise that could be reached here? Maybe release a bare-bones Trisquel that is just a liberated ubuntu as soon as possible; and then work on the custom Trisquel changes and add them through the update manager as they come along over the months. Why should the entire os be put on hold for changes I may not really need/want? Am I the only one that feels this way?"

I totally agree with this, but I am not an OS developer so I don't know much about what goes into something like this or whether or not it's feasible.

akirashinigami

I am a member!

I am a translator!

Offline
Beigetreten: 02/25/2010

The FSF recently hosted a Kickstarter-like fundraiser to raise money for the development of GNU Mediagoblin. It may be possible to get them to host a similar fundraiser for Trisquel development.

Chris

I am a member!

Offline
Beigetreten: 04/23/2011

It would be nice to scratch out a plan. What I don't know is the amount of effort required for each particular task which is being done. I know there is abrowser, there is AR9170, and some other pieces (visual), and enhancements (for visually impaired). I wish I had the time to work on a distribution (I actually am although the goals are different even if many principles are shared).

It wouldn't hurt to bring up a fund raising inquiry with the FSF, Rubén, etc.

Right now I have no idea if such an effort would work.

I think more coordination though could go a long ways. At the same time though any changes are going to annoy someone. If you discontinue the non-LTS release to focus on back porting critical pieces there are going to be people who get upset that they can't play the latest games or run a particular critical application.

jdenz
Offline
Beigetreten: 11/18/2011

Oh, look, there's already a "Crowd Funding" feature on the Trisquel website:

https://trisquel.info/en/tasks

I submitted one to be added that asks for $50,000 to hire a full-time developer in order to catch Trisquel up to Ubuntu development and create an accounting and reporting process for donations.

Hopefully it'll be added soon and folks will start pledging to fund it.

Chris

I am a member!

Offline
Beigetreten: 04/23/2011

Was this a joke?

akirashinigami

I am a member!

I am a translator!

Offline
Beigetreten: 02/25/2010

Yeah, I have no idea what's going on with the crowdfunding page.

quiliro@congresolibre.org
Offline
Beigetreten: 10/28/2010

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

On 12/12/12 08:35, name at domain wrote:
> Oh, look, there's already a "Crowd Funding" feature on the Trisquel website:
>
> https://trisquel.info/en/tasks

Nobody answers the messages sent there. I think it would be great that
it would work.

- --
Saludos libres,

Quiliro Ordóñez
Presidente (en conjunto con el resto de socios)
Asociación de Software Libre del Ecuador - ASLE
Av de la Prensa N58-219 y Cristóbal Vaca de Castro
Quito, Ecuador
(593)2-600 8579
(593)98-454 8078

Todo correo que reciba será tratado como información pública, de libre
copia y modificación, sin importar cualquier nota de confidencialidad.
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: GnuPG v1.4.11 (GNU/Linux)
Comment: Using GnuPG with undefined - http://www.enigmail.net/
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=P6Bt
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

quiliro@congresolibre.org
Offline
Beigetreten: 10/28/2010

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

As of december 1st, these are the latest releases of Trisquel 6.0:
trisquel-mini_6.0-20121201_amd64.iso
trisquel-mini_6.0-20121201_i686.iso
trisquel_6.0-20121201-fsf_amd64.iso
trisquel_6.0-20121201-fsf_i686.iso
trisquel_6.0-20121201-i18n_amd64.iso
trisquel_6.0-20121201-i18n_i686.iso
trisquel_6.0-20121201_amd64.iso
trisquel_6.0-20121201_i686.iso

What is the difference between the fsf version and the i18n version?

- --
Saludos libres,

Quiliro Ordóñez
Presidente (en conjunto con el resto de socios)
Asociación de Software Libre del Ecuador - ASLE
Av de la Prensa N58-219 y Cristóbal Vaca de Castro
Quito, Ecuador
(593)2-600 8579
(593)98-454 8078
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: GnuPG v1.4.11 (GNU/Linux)
Comment: Using GnuPG with undefined - http://www.enigmail.net/
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=kodD
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

rakubx

I am a member!

Offline
Beigetreten: 09/21/2010

In last months we saw many fresh trisquel 6.0 iso's.
And it's really good news. Is it possible to provide some extra info :
What are the differences, packages, etc ? Or may be add this info to wiki pages.