Evil maid attack!

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nadebula.1984
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Iscritto: 05/01/2018

Note: this event took place at around a decade before.

When I was doctoral candidate, one day I earned a small quantity of scholarship, and I planned to purchase some cheap used parts to upgrade the legacy workstations in my lab. The old workstations were based on (rather weak and power consuming) Pentium-4 processors and 945 series motherboards. I purchased several Celeron (Core 2 architecture) CPUs and G31/G41 motherboards. All these chipsets used ICH7 southbridge, so Losedows could still startup on the new motherboards.

I prepared everything I needed and hid myself somewhere inside the lab and waited until everyone else left the lab and locked the doors. I first sabotaged the surveillance system using a universal backdoor that I planted into the controlling server. Then I replaced the motherboards with CPUs, one workstation after one, until next day morning. When finished, I counterfeited surveillance video (by copying old video files recorded at night several days before) and restarted the surveillance system.

When my colleagues came to the lab, they only found their workstations run much faster, but never knew what happened that night. I put every piece of old hardware (old motherboards, Pentium-4 CPUs, and IDE-interface optical drives, etc.) in a big sack, carried them to somewhere where such hardware could be recycled, and sold them for about $10.

andyprough
Online
Iscritto: 02/12/2015

That's very funny! You are a very skilled thief, but too ethical to steal anything. Instead you leave gifts like Santa Claus.

nadebula.1984
Offline
Iscritto: 05/01/2018

It was not the first time that I performed an "evil maid attack". When I was in high school, my classmates and I sabotaged our lecturer's workstation (the only one that had a hard disk).

The attack was simple. We guessed the BIOS password within only a few tries. Then we entered BIOS setup program and enabled the hard disk. Again, we guessed the login password within only a few tries, and then copied as many things as possible. (Regrettably, the files went into "digital dark age", due to the proprietary archive format we used was discontinued.)

Finally, we used partition editor to create an infinite loop in the partition table, rendering the computer unusable. Our teacher just thought that the hard disk was broken and purchased a new one.