Graphics Card and Windows gaming on Trisquel

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Cyberwolf
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Hello Trisquel-World :)

I have just bought a new graphics card and put it into my computer, there seems to be a driver missing, though. I've been looking through the forum a bit but couldn't find a solution that fits my problem, so maybe someone could help me or point me to the post that already asks the very same question.

I bought the new graphics card to install and play some computer games I have at home; since I suppose that neither U-play nor Steam are FOSS I tend to use Windows, too, on my computer. Having read a bit around it seems to me that using a virtual box (is that the right name?) might be a better option than partitioning the hard drive and using GNU/Linux and Windows simultaneously. Does anybody have any experience with Windows gaming on Trisquel? I'd appreciate any advice a lot :)

That was it so far, thanks in advance for any help on the issue and I hope to be able to help other Trisquel noobs in the not too distant future, too :)

best regards,
Clemens

ryanpcmcquen
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Joined: 12/16/2016

I would look into Wine or Crossover.

ADFENO
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Joined: 12/31/2012

Sorry, but I think it's better to look into Wine only.

I tried looking for Crossover both in the Free Software Directory,
Trisquel's repository, Parabola's repository, Guix's repository, and
gNewSense's repository, and couldn't find it. So I guess one can
consider it non-free software.
--
* pt-BR: Brasileiro | en: Brazilian
* pt-BR: Ativista do software livre | en: Free/libre software activist
* https://libreplanet.org/wiki/User:Adfeno
* pt-BR: Palestrante, consultor e avaliador | en: Speaker, consultant and evaluator

Magic Banana

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Joined: 07/24/2010

CrossOver is proprietary software. It is never the solution. Please do not present it as such.

Wine is free software. But running proprietary software on Wine does not make it any better.

ryanpcmcquen
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Joined: 12/16/2016

You do know that Crossover is the number one contributor to Wine development, right?

Mappack
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Joined: 10/13/2016

That doesn't make their proprietary version of wine ethical.

ryanpcmcquen
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Joined: 12/16/2016

I completely agree, but if using Crossover keeps the OP from having a Windows partition, that is far more ethical and better for Free Software.

ADFENO
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Joined: 12/31/2012

There's no middle ground between free/libre software and
non-(free/libre) software. Although there are limits as to what even the
most purist free/libre software activist can achieve (see note), this
limitation doesn't mean that we free/libre software activists should
make the general public compromise in any middle-term within.

As an important observation, whether to use non-(free/libre) software for
personal activities is up to the user to decide, but we, free/libre
software activists should influence this decision only against the
compromise, not towards.

Note: Before bringing the "is your computer 'free/libre hardware'?"
argument please be aware that there's no computer with 100% free/libre
hardware design that is proven to be also certified with Respects Your Freedom.

ryanpcmcquen
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I will just point to this Stallman article about a compromise for using Facebook: https://stallman.org/facebook-presence.html

I agree the OP should distance himself from anything Windows-related, if that is impossible though (let's hope it is not), there is a middle ground between running a full install of Windows, and using a binary compatibility layer for Windows.

Magic Banana

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Joined: 07/24/2010

This forum does not aim to support users in running proprietary software (including in video games). Using that software is bad for you. It does not respect your freedoms.

VirtualBox is problematic too:

onpon4
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Joined: 05/30/2012

Recent GPUs don't work with libre kernels because they require proprietary firmware blobs. Also, hardware that doesn't require proprietary software to work typically requires a kernel update to work fully, so in general getting a more recent kernel from jxself's Linux-libre repository is what you should do if hardware doesn't work:

https://jxself.org/linux-libre/

onpon4
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As for gaming, I would like to suggest you help fund or contribute to libre game development rather than buying proprietary games. What kinds of games do you like?

Cyberwolf
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Joined: 01/07/2017

Sounds like a really good idea. I love playing games such as Rome and Medieval II: Total War, Splinter Cell and Assassin's Creed, Skyrim, Dishonored, Secret Files: Tunguska, Deus Ex and Mass Effect to name some of my favourites.

I heard that Steam provides games for GNU/Linux, too, being proprietary software (as I suppose it is), would make that unfree though, right? Are there any games like the ones I mentioned above as of yet for Trisquel?

onpon4
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> I heard that Steam provides games for GNU/Linux, too, being proprietary software (as I suppose it is), would make that unfree though, right?

Steam is proprietary and almost all of the games on it are proprietary. Those that aren't can be obtained through other means.

> Are there any games like the ones I mentioned above as of yet for Trisquel?

That's why I asked. :) No libre game lives up to the standards of modern proprietary games, but those that exist can be improved. I think you should take a look at 0 A.D. in particular:

https://play0ad.com/

The rest of the games you mentioned are unlike any libre games that are currently available (in particular, I'm not aware of any libre stealth games), so those would have to be started from scratch. But here are some other kinds of adventure games and RPGs to try:

* Naev: http://naev.org
* Nox Imperii: http://noximperii.com/
* Beneath a Steel Sky (package "beneath-a-steel-sky")
* Freedroid RPG: http://www.freedroid.org/
* Hexoshi: https://hexoshi.gitlab.io

Of course, you can also look at the Libre Game Wiki for other games:

https://libregamewiki.org/Main_Page

Where there isn't a libre game project that's like what you're looking for, someone is going to need to start it from scratch. The most active thing you could do to that end is organize a team, put together a techdemo, and run a crowdfunding campaign similar to the one I ran for Hexoshi.[1] Being able to contribute something significant (e.g. graphics) would be very helpful if you want to take this route.

[1] https://www.crowdsupply.com/onpon4/hexoshi

Cyberwolf
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That sounds beyond awesome :) now I totally want to create the first libre stealth game inspired by the Assassin's Creed series among others (actually I've been thinking about something like that for quiet some time, but never thought about really doing it), so thanks for the inspiration!!

I had a closer look at your game Hexoshi, can you give me some advice as to what one should consider before creating a libre game and what common noob mistakes are in your experience? Appreciated that a lot :)

best regards,
C

onpon4
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> can you give me some advice as to what one should consider before creating a libre game and what common noob mistakes are in your experience?

The most common mistake is planning too much, or putting too much emphasis on things like the story or the ideas you have. It wastes time that could be spent on development, and you probably won't have an end result exactly like you first imagine it anyway (either because something is just not worth it or because it turns out that there's something better you can do, or both). Focus on what you have so far, not what you might have years down the line, or you'll be perpetually stuck in development hell.

The second most common mistake is focusing too much on minor details. Focus on getting the game working first, then extend it. Don't go spending hours on e.g. a lighting engine that you're not going to use yet; not only could this be a complete waste of time, even if it isn't, there's no guarantee that you will get it exactly how you need it the first time.

The third most common mistake is to make a really big game your first game. Start small; contribute to existing games, make some simpler arcade-style games, etc. Otherwise you will be overwhelmed with the complexity of what you're trying to do, and it will be that much harder because you have no experience.

One game that is a perfect demonstration of all three of these mistakes is called "Platform Masters". I don't think it will ever be released, but even if it does get released, I'm just about certain that it won't be any good.

Another tip: use a libre game engine rather than doing everything in C from scratch. Here are a few good ones:

* Godot Engine: https://godotengine.org/
* GDevelop: http://compilgames.net/
* SGE Game Engine: http://stellarengine.nongnu.org
* LÖVE: https://love2d.org/

Disclaimer: I am the author of the SGE Game Engine. That's what Hexoshi uses.

calebhc
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Joined: 10/12/2016

Good advice and thanks for the engine recommendations! :)

ryanpcmcquen
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onpon4
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Joined: 05/30/2012

It lists multiple games that are proprietary, so don't depend on it. Explanations for why some of the games listed there are no good can be found here:

https://onpon4.github.io/other/gaming-trap/

ryanpcmcquen
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Good article, the user must always be weary. Battle for Wesnoth was on that Slant list, which is a rather excellent and established Libre game.

I do, however, disagree with your assessment of JavaScript games. As someone who spends all their free time writing Libre JavaScript, I have found that most JavaScript games are completely Libre. In fact, not all minified JavaScript is obfuscated either, that seems to be a rather common misconception, most times you can drop that code into something like: http://jsbeautifier.org and the code will be perfectly readable.

onpon4
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> I have found that most JavaScript games are completely Libre.

Of course there exist libre JavaScript games. You seem to have missed the point of the entry: JavaScript is software, so you have to check each one on a case-by-case basis. The trap is in not knowing that JavaScript code is software and therefore assuming that any JavaScript game is fine regardless of the license.

> In fact, not all minified JavaScript is obfuscated either, that seems to be a rather common misconception, most times you can drop that code into something like: http://jsbeautifier.org and the code will be perfectly readable.

You can potentially decode what any compiled binary does by using e.g. a disassembler. You don't get any comments or variable names, but you can do it. That doesn't excuse lack of source code. All it means is that it's potentially possible for someone to fix the problem by deriving the binary into usable source code, assuming the binary is under a license which allows this (which typically isn't the case).

Cyberwolf
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Joined: 01/07/2017

Thanks for the continuous posts, very interesting to read through :)

If i may, I'd like to reask my very first question of this thread: I have just bought a new graphics card and put it into my computer, there seems however to be a driver missing, though. The problem being, that there is a only three options available when it comes to resolution 1600x1200 is not one of them, which is a pity since I call a lovely 22 inch monitor my own and was used to said resolution, now having to choose from the rather disappointing three alternative shown on the attached screenshot :/ might it have to do something with the statement 'Built-in Display' or is there a driver missing? The graphics card I used to have by the way was a GeForce 9800 GTX+, the new one in current use being a GeForce 720 sth. if I'm not completly mistaken.

I've been looking through the forum a bit but couldn't find a solution that fits my problem, so maybe someone could help me or point me to the post that already asks the very same question?

Screenshot from 2017-01-11 22:42:27.png
Cyberwolf
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UPDATE: sorry for the kind of double post, I thought my last one has gone into the ether, but apperantly it hasn't and it doesn't seem possible to delete posts, is that correct?

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Thanks for the continuous posts that I do very much enjoy reading through.

A couple of questions that arose:

(I) When starting to create a libre game, what programming language(s) would you recommend?

(II) Coming back to original first question of the problems with the new graphics card that I put into my computer. With my old GeForce 9800 GTX+ I enjoyed a lovely 1600x1200 resolution, now however that is no longer an option since it gives me only three options being 1280x1024 (5:4), 1024x768 (4:3) and 800x600 (4:3), none of which being a satisfying one for my 22-inch display. I've been looking through the forum a bit but couldn't find a solution that fits my problem, so maybe someone could help me or point me to the post that already asks the very same question.

(III) Addition to (I): the game that I would like to create is intended to look a bit like a cross-over of the Splinter Cell, Assassin's Creed and Skyrim franchises. Now I would love to include an open-world setting and a fighting 'engine' (is that a thing, I hope what I mean, anyways) like in the three mentioned examples, is that possible (most of the libre games I have come accross so far didn't strike me as very sophisticated graphicswise) and is it an option to use motion-caption techniques for cutscenes and to apply/show a martial arts style both similar to the one in the following video (Splinter Cell Blacklist - The Man Behind The Combat --> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=egC-BeT6Dtk) considering having a successful patreon project or another similar one?

Soon.to.be.Free
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Joined: 07/03/2016

I'll do be my best to help, although others will probably give far better and more accurate advice.

(I) Personally, I would recommend Python due to its clean syntax, high-level nature and wide support. Javascript is also pretty good on these fronts (though its syntax is a little too brace-heavy, I personally think). However, OnPon4's advice to use game engine (libre of course!) is far better than choice of language, as it hides much of the dirty work from you.

(II) I'm no expert, but a few posts regarding the issue appear to suggest it may be to do with the monitor (sources attached at end of section). Try running "xrandr" (no quotes) at the command line and see if throws up some sort of message like "xrandr: Failed to get size of gamma for output default". If that's the case, you may need to set your monitor resolution manually, which I believe is detailed in the first source below. Hopefully someone else can be a little more helpful than I am in regards to this.
Source 1
Source 2

(III) I'm unable to assist here, except to point out that you probably meant "capture" and not "caption". Sorry!

EDIT: I'm pretty sure you can't delete posts, nor edit them after they've been replied to.

onpon4
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> what programming language(s) would you recommend?

Whichever one is appropriate for the engine you're using. :) The engine matters much more than the language. But personally, my favorite language is Python (which is why the SGE Game Engine uses Python).

> With my old GeForce 9800 GTX+ I enjoyed a lovely 1600x1200 resolution, now however that is no longer an option since it gives me only three options being 1280x1024 (5:4), 1024x768 (4:3) and 800x600 (4:3), none of which being a satisfying one for my 22-inch display.

That tends to happen with new GPUs. You'll need to update the kernel and may need to update to a newer version of X as well. You can get the latest version of Linux-libre here:

https://jxself.org/linux-libre/

> the game that I would like to create is intended to look a bit like a cross-over of the Splinter Cell, Assassin's Creed and Skyrim franchises.

I suggest you start with something smaller. I developed around 10 games before I started on Hexoshi, and the first 5 or so were such utter crap that I wouldn't want to display them on my home page even if they weren't dependent on proprietary software.

For example, you could think of an aspect of these games that you like that you can make a simple mini-game based on, and make that mini-game.

If you're not interested in small games, another way you can get experience is to contribute to or just mess around with the source code of an existing project, like 0 A.D. or Naev.

The important thing is that you're working on achievable projects that will result in something you enjoy playing in no more than a couple of months. Once you've gained some experience, you will be more able to lead the development of a complex 3-D game like the one you want to make, and you will be able to do it both better and faster.

> is that possible (most of the libre games I have come accross so far didn't strike me as very sophisticated graphicswise) and is it an option to use motion-caption techniques for cutscenes and to apply/show a martial arts style both similar to the one in the following video (Splinter Cell Blacklist - The Man Behind The Combat --> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=egC-BeT6Dtk) considering having a successful patreon project or another similar one?

Anything is possible, but do note that the kind of graphical detail you see in proprietary games is very expensive; think tens or even hundreds of millions of dollars. Realistically, you will have to settle for much less, because raking in that kind of money requires mainstream appeal, which you're just not going to get without a well-established publisher (and the well-established publishers aren't going to publish a libre game for you).

One thing that can be done to work around this is to make a style out of your limited budget. A good example is Xonotic, which has been given a sort of cartoonish graphical style that doesn't need a whole lot of detail to look great, and as a result it's in my opinion one of the best-looking libre games out there. Hexoshi is another example: one of the reasons I chose to make it in a SNES-like style is simply because it's much cheaper than higher-resolution graphics would be, but can still look great.