king of king

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Masaru Suzuqi
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Joined: 06/06/2018

Can anyone translate these Japanese words?

These were proverbs of my friend. He was the best good man who I have ever met.
Just be a good feeling, you will be OK... Say some greetings properly, politely...

シャバくさい若僧はお断り
Maybe it should be "No greenhorn" or something.

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andyprough
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Joined: 02/12/2015

"young, dirty monks not accepted"

Something like that?

What's the name of your friend - Jesus?

Masaru Suzuqi
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Joined: 06/06/2018

Thanks. I think "not accepted" must be a better natural expression of native English speakers than "no" since you are a native speaker. But about "monks", I guess you might be misunderstanding. 僧 means indeed monks and 若 means indeed young, then it makes the word 若僧, but when we say 若僧, it doesn't mean young monks. It means general young people and the word has a nuance which like when the bad elders get mad at young people's rudeness, they say like "Hey, 若僧".
Maybe "young, dirty" might be a proper expression though do you have a good slang that like those bad (actually good, but you know?) elders say? I thought "worldly" might pinpoints the nuance but it seemed that the word has positive nuance.
The word シャバくさい doesn't have positive nuance. If the word "worldly" had only negative nuance, I think the word can express the nuance of the word シャバくさい. btw if we say シャバくせえ, the word gets more aggressive feelings. Obviously he is fed up with certain kinds of young (not just young people though) people's rudeness or bad habits or something like that when he says シャバくせえ. Sorry but as supplement, シャバくせえ sounds urban elder people's slang. Specifically Tokyo-born people. Do you have an idea of it? I have studied it sometimes quite seriously but I didn't get it. This is a good opportunity. Thanks. But I am not sure if I could explain the nuance of this word.

andyprough
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Joined: 02/12/2015

Ahh, I see. In America, our older people have a similar expression. They say, "get off my lawn!"

It means that younger people have no respect, and so older people don't want to be near them.

Masaru Suzuqi
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Joined: 06/06/2018

I think there is a slight or big difference of the nuance but I liked the words very much. Get off my lawn. You mean, the words have some historical funny nuance, huh? I see it is funny. I think I would make a T-shirt that the words are printed on.
Get off my lawn! Tourists might laugh. Thank you thank you.

EDiT: right? > huh?

Masaru Suzuqi
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Joined: 06/06/2018

And I recommend you guys to make a T-short that the words シャバくさい若僧はお断り are printed on. I am sure almost 100% Japanese girls will laugh. The T-shirt will suit particularly you since your looking. Trust me.

andyprough
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Joined: 02/12/2015

We already have many "get off my lawn" t-shirts in America. But we need one that says that and シャバくさい若僧はお断り. That would be a great t-shirt!

Masaru Suzuqi
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Joined: 06/06/2018

Yes. I think so too. I want one.