So, where do you guys get Content that's Non-free yet DRM-free? (not talking about Games unless there's a free engine)

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commodore256
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Joined: 01/10/2013

All I know of is...

Gog: They have games that are compatible with free engines and reimplementations of free engines. They also have DRM-free documentaries.

Humble Book Bundle: They have two book bundles right now, Peanuts and Make.

Comixology: They have a selection of DRM-free Comics, but they make it really inconvenient to filter out DRM's comics and even the URL I have that says it DRM-free is still missing DRM-free Comics. Most (if not all) Archie Comics along with the Walking Dead are DRM-free and you can which one is DRM-free by the download icon in the store page of the Comic. https://www.comixology.com/DRM-Free-Comics/page/2794

Anybody that sells MP3s: The late Steve Jobs did at least one thing we all can admire, he used his Conman powers for good instead of evil. He made all of the big music publisher agree to a change in the terms of the contract making the EULA more restrictive making it allowed to run on fewer devices of which the money hoarders in the suits loves, but they didn't read the the part that says "all music will be DRM-free" so the EULA didn't matter. Too bad his trick didn't work a second time with Movies :(

onpon4
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Joined: 05/30/2012

There are lots of people who share even though it's illegal. So that's one possible source, although you often have to contend with low-quality copies.

commodore256
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Joined: 01/10/2013

We're talking about paying for non-free content that's DRM-free and compatible with a 100% free software stack. (minus wine for extracting asset files that works in free engines) We're not talking about piracy.

Edit: I see what you're getting at now, you're saying publishers don't do that because it makes piracy easy. Well, yeah, it does, but when just one crack exist, piracy becomes easy. You only need one copy with circumvented DRM to exist and then DRM is useless to publishers. DRM just makes hurts the customer and only benefits the publisher until it's cracked. But cracks don't help me because I want to obey the law. I like to tell publishers "You won't get my money as long as you have DRM".

SuperTramp83

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Joined: 10/31/2014

bittorrent is the word. Sharing is mandatory :)

quantumgravity
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Joined: 04/22/2013

jamendo.com
archive.org

Amazon.com is bad for many reasons, but they _do_ have drm free music for more or less reasonable prices.
I'm not using it myself, but i heard that you can pay and download without using non-free software (very likely non-free javascript, however).

Besides, at least in my country it's legal to download videos from youtube using youtube-dl.
Afterwards you can convert the song into any format you like.
Even better would be watching the music on youtube directly because (afaik) the artist gets some money. Correct me if i'm wrong.

I encourage you not to break the law and i consider it wrong to do so.
I'm glad that not everybody makes his own law based on whatever ideas he has in his crazy head, and i don't see any reason why we should be an exception.
If you break the law because you think it's wrong, you have to be okay with other people breaking other laws based on their opinions about what's right or wrong.
Think twice.

onpon4
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Joined: 05/30/2012

> Even better would be watching the music on youtube directly because (afaik) the artist gets some money. Correct me if i'm wrong.

It's probably the publisher, not the artist, and it's only if the ads are actually seen, which requires YouTube's proprietary JavaScript code. It also has to be seen in its entirety; partial viewings followed by clicking "skip" don't count.

onpon4
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Joined: 05/30/2012

> If you break the law because you think it's wrong, you have to be okay with other people breaking other laws based on their opinions about what's right or wrong.

You may find it hard to believe, but this does happen. People follow laws against doing things they don't consider to be unethical solely so that they don't get punished for breaking them; it's nothing more than a risk analysis.

commodore256
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Joined: 01/10/2013

I don't obey the law because the law is right nor because I'm scared of Jail, I do it to play their game. If they don't want to sell DRM-free, fine, I don't have to buy from them.

I wish there was a campaign from many very mainstream sources that used twitter and facebook hashtags where they got a lot of people to pledge to purge DRM. People like the surviving Star Trek Cast (George Takei has lots of followers) and other celebrities, but I don't think we should go to them, we might piss them off. The free software community already pissed off Wil Wheaton. I think we need to start small with accepting online video personalities with an emphasis on Free Software and DRM-free living or something stupid where the FSF gets PewDiePie to play games with free engines like Doom, Quake or Morrowind. I can see him doing his usual WTF reactions by swearing in Swedish when an Imp or Ogre scares the hell out of him or when a Dark Brotherhood Assassin kicks his butt.

The free software community needs more likeable/charming people to spread their influence.

JadedCtrl
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Joined: 08/11/2014

Civil disobedience is nonviolent resistence to laws one thinks are unjust.
Whacking someone with a stick isn't civil disobedience. Sharing a movie is.

commodore256
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Joined: 01/10/2013

Well, if you file share, you tell them you don't pay for things. If more people played by their rules and sent the MPAA letters saying you'll never buy a movie as long as it has DRM and while they have DRM, you'll refuse to add mindshare by talking about DRM Movies and not even pirate it.

If enough people committed to it over a 6 month period, that would all go away.

onpon4
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Joined: 05/30/2012

> if you file share, you tell them you don't pay for things.

I don't think so. I think you tell them that you don't respect copyright monopolies. That's very different. There can be all sorts of reasons for not respecting copyright, and being unwilling or unable to pay for authorized copies can be one reason, but if the copyright industry assumed that this was the only reason, why would they go to any efforts to stop it?

I think far more prevalent reasons for sharing when it is illegal to do so, as well as downloading such unauthorized copies, are convenience and altruism.

commodore256
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Joined: 01/10/2013

They don't see political ideologies and hatred of publishers for having a 95 year monopoly on content or ogolipolizing all mainstream media. All they see is "people are consuming our content without paying because they're cheap".

It's more productive to get a lot of people to exploit that greed with trending social media topics about DRM and getting people together and saying "hey, we enjoined your stuff in the past, but we won't be customers anymore as long as you have DRM".

But anyway, this topic is suppose to be for methods of paying for non-free content that's DRM-free and compatible with a 100% free software stack. I'm still open to suggestions.

onpon4
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Joined: 05/30/2012

Boycotts on viewing works is never going to be effective. First of all, because many of these works are mainstream, and that means that most people are viewing it; ergo, not a part of the boycott. Second of all, and this is most important, you're not going to convince the majority of people, or even a particularly large minority of people, to stop participating in their own culture.

What happens with attempts to boycott culture is only people who weren't particularly interested in the aspect of culture to begin with participate, and either the people producing mainstream works correctly recognize this and do nothing, or they bend to their will... and then immediately get financially destroyed by this decision, because those people don't actually jump at the chance to buy the thing.

commodore256
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The only reason why Boycotts fail is because it's not mainstream. My take is to make it mainstream. Make it more mainstream than #PerformanceMatters.

SuperTramp83

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Joined: 10/31/2014

well said, Jaded +5

quantumgravity
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Joined: 04/22/2013

"Whacking someone with a stick isn't civil disobedience. Sharing a movie is."

Says who?
You?
Maybe somebody thinks that "not being allowed to whack somebody with a stick" is an unjust law.
What's the difference between you two? Mere opinion.

"Civil disobedience" is ridiculously out of place here.
The term arised in an era when law was mistreating human rights in a different dimension than today.
You can refer to this term if you're forced by law to shoot a person. People who didn't do this can rightfully claim to practiced "civil disobedience".
I advice everybody to have some respect and use this term not for such tiny things like getting a movie or music.
If you break the law, there should be a damn good reason for it.
Just wanting to have some music is NOT enough.

onpon4
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I agree that infringing copyright doesn't qualify as an act of civil disobedience (though not for the same reason, if I understand you correctly; I think it doesn't count because it's a collection of private acts that people try to keep low-key, not a public demonstration), but I don't agree that you should never break laws you disagree with just because you don't have a "damn good reason for it". What's a "good" reason is highly subjective, anyway.

For example, you could legally watch movies with Netflix, or you could illegally watch them with Popcorn Time. The former option requires running proprietary software. I would consider this to be a good reason to use the latter instead. The copyright industry would vehemently disagree with me.

SuperTramp83

I am a translator!

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>I encourage you not to break the law and i consider it wrong to do so.

When a law is unjust I deem it a moral must to break it. I encourage you to break every and all unjust, unethical laws and I consider it very right to do so.

jxself
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Joined: 09/13/2010

MythTV can be used to record non-free stuff from television channels. Commercials deleted. Converted into free formats. No DRM.

commodore256
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You can only record unencrypted programming though. So most cable channels are a no-no. (unless you're recording analogue cable)

jxself
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Joined: 09/13/2010

But it's something. So I'm pointing it out.

andermetalsh
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Joined: 01/04/2013

Didn't dvb-c tuners have encrypted decoding compatibility?

northernarcher
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Joined: 12/24/2014

Libre.fm

Larissa

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Joined: 07/12/2014

TV, GOG, Bandcamp, DVD, CD, Blender cloud, Blender institute

andermetalsh
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Joined: 01/04/2013

" GOG,"

Scummvm works with a ton of adventures. Just get the deb files from www.scummvm.org . Even better, try the nighly, it supports even more games.

They have propietary data, but the engine is 100% free.

onpon4
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Joined: 05/30/2012

> They have propietary data, but the engine is 100% free.

No, this isn't true in any case. All adventure games include a scripting engine of some sort which is integral to making the scenario work correctly. This software is a part of the game's "data", and under the same terms. It is not replaced by ScummVM, although patches are sometimes applied to fix bugs.

The same holds true for visual novels, by the way.

The only ScummVM games that are libre software are the freeware versions of these six games:

- Beneath a Steel Sky
- Flight of the Amazon Queen
- Drascula
- Lure of the Temptress
- Sfinx
- Soltys

All the rest include proprietary scripts.

ADFENO
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Joined: 12/31/2012

I don't really know how deep game data integrates with game engines, but
if the game data is just non-functional (no scripts, fonts, manuals,
executables, and so on) then any correctly licensed game data that
allows the user to at least share the work for non-commercial purposes
will be just fine.

But if the game data happens to have functional data then there's room
for software freedom and, personally speaking, simply asking for
DRM-free game data won't solve the moral, and perhaps even ethical,
dilemmas that will arise.

commodore256
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Joined: 01/10/2013

I just found this and it pleases my inner audiophile. http://store.acousticsounds.com/index.cfm?get=results&start=1%20&CategoryID=382