thinkpenguin question- graphic

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bluzeo
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Joined: 08/27/2015

hey i am currently looking at an thinkpenguin pro but i need to get this custom made becuase i needing the titian gt grapghics card for it can render avi files and np4. i am thinkinking correctly that the titian even thogh the price is crazy worth it for me an film editor to use? i know that the noveau should be use but this for ny job abd denads thoses none free codecs

tomlukeywood
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Joined: 12/05/2014

"for it can render avi files and mp4."

my pc uses integrated intel graphics and can render high quality mpeg-4 and avi (ogg, webm, mpeg-2 etc etc) video very well

so i don’t think you rely need an external GPU for this purpose.

you may want to get a good CPU and at least 4GB of ram for rendering though

JadedCtrl
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Joined: 08/11/2014

Huh? You need a Nvidia card to render certain file formats?
You can render avi and mp4 files on pretty much any fair GPU (Including ones that work better than Nouveau) or CPU.
If you get a Penguin machine, you'll be able to render avi and mp4 files, period- this I guarantee you.

SuperTramp83

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Joined: 10/31/2014

you can software render avi and mp4 on any computer with a decent cpu without the need of any video acceleration whatsoever..

davidnotcoulthard
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Joined: 02/28/2014

Games, AND NOTHING ELSE (excuse all-caps) come close to actually, technically requiring discrete cards as far as I know.

For best graphics performance without discrete cards though, just get a Broadwell (not skylake, not Haswell), or ix-5xxxC processor and then go without a discrete card.

And if I recall correctly video-editing is more CPU intensice than graphics intensive - maybe a Haswell i7 would serve you better than a Broadwell i5 despite the latter's better graphics.

Long story short, you don't need a gaming card to do video editing. If I were you and didn't care about free software and didn't want to game but wanted to do video editing, I'd honestly consider by-passing a discrete card (and if needed, but probably not, get a Broadwell ix-5xxxC card). It simply isn't needed.

And rendering .avi and .mp4 don't depend on graphic cards.

tomlukeywood
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Joined: 12/05/2014

"Games, AND NOTHING ELSE (excuse all-caps) come close to actually, technically requiring discrete cards as far as I know."

well if you were doing video editing or making highly detailed animations professionally then you would most likely want a good GPU just to improve your productivity as stuff would render quicker

but apart from that and games you don’t rely need a good GPU

davidnotcoulthard
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Joined: 02/28/2014

Surely Intel Iris 6200 (comes with Broadwell ix-5xxxC CPUs) would be enough for something like that? Or am I mistaken?

tomlukeywood
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Joined: 12/05/2014

Sorry submitted the post twice and i made a duplicate post

bluzeo
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Joined: 08/27/2015

the graphic card is for the frames that it renders - the lower ebd cards drop aboout 5 frames and that bothers me a lot - i going to be rendering a lot so i figure the titian be a good choice - i use to be surround by macs that been fitted with very high end cards at college and at high school so i know i would need them.

Larissa

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Joined: 07/12/2014

What software are you going to use? Nuevo isn´t Cuda nor opencl compatible...
I don´t know why how, low end gpu´s drop frames, if any.
For editing, I would take, if you need so much cpu power, ASUS KFSN4-DRE server/workstation board. It has 2 cpu-sockets both up to 8 cores per Socket. It is also Libreboot compatible (http://www.libreboot.org/docs/hcl/kfsn4-dre.html).
Maybe some Computer shop in your near or eventually thinkpenguin, would build a computer with this main-board.

tomlukeywood
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Joined: 12/05/2014

"both up to 8 cores per Socket."
and if you get a certain type of the board you can have 16 cores per socket!

bluzeo
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Joined: 08/27/2015

i may ended up buying an system76 workhorse cause this going to pack an punch for my editing

davidnotcoulthard
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Joined: 02/28/2014

Honestly I recommend building your own PC (if you have the time that is, otherwise...it's still not the world's worst crime not to).

tomlukeywood
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Joined: 12/05/2014

i know several computer shops that will build pc's for you if you bring all the parts for a small fee.
so if your worried about destroying your expensive CPU then you could just do this

also as stated before i recommend the ASUS KFSN4-DRE server/workstation board if your building it yourself!

Chris

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Joined: 04/23/2011

I'm not sure how the ASUS KFSN4-DRE would work, but it would be better to go that route than System76 from a free software perspective. System76 isn't concerned about software freedom and your system might not work with Trisquel or other 100% free systems.. not to mention have parts with non-free drivers/firmware. Which is bad for multiple reasons even on a system with a non-free distribution.

I'm not entirely sure that your experience with low end hardware in the past is actually comparable to today's low end integrated graphics offerings.

I wouldn't go with Skylake though at this point. We're working on a Broadwell model with Iris Pro graphics now that socketed desktop CPUs are available. That probably is your best bet if you ask me.

I should also bring up the issue with going with boards like ASUS KFSN4-DRE and others that have coreboot/libreboot support. The boards tend not to be readily available on the market so either you'll end up paying a premium (a quick look suggests about $300 USD in the USA and probably staggeringly higher outside the USA if its available at all) or going with a refurbished board. The refurbished hardware comes with its own challenges and one of the reasons we haven't offered laptops with coreboot in the past (besides the non-trival task of porting it from one model to another).

I'd definitely suggest if you do decide to go with a libreboot system you get it from minifree as Francis has done the work of making sure everything is going to work as "good as it'll get" anyway. It also helps fund future projects.

Francis: If your reading this you might want to keep your eye out for the FCC talk on Hacker Public Radio I did. Mentioned minifree in it a few times. Actually I think I mentioned it on a few other FCC talks I've given in the past two weeks. The savewifi wiki has the shows listed if you go to the main page.

bluzeo
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Joined: 08/27/2015

i am very tired of the FSF...... - i support opensource yes- but for me to get my work now since i got an good job (started to day i install fedora and chrome ) i am debating getting me a beef up think station and make that my render station - only render video on it and with an good graphic card. trisquel is what i wanted but for me to work i settle with fedora 22 with classic gnome.

Chris

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Joined: 04/23/2011

If you end using a distribution with non-free pieces just remember that this isn't the place to discuss it as your going in the wrong direction. BUT- people here are still more than willing to help you avoid non-free pieces on said distribution. So for instance if you have a question about a graphics card, a wifi card, a motherboard, or something else like that you can still ask "is x free software friendly"? Or a particular program for that matter. People won't help you pick out a non-free graphics card, but they will help you to avoid a non-free card. As it stands I'm confident even if you did get a non-free graphics card there is no reason people won't help you with getting a system where everything else is free software friendly.

J.B. Nicholson-Owens
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Joined: 06/09/2014

> i am very tired of the FSF...... - i support opensource yes- [...]

I'm not sure if you think the FSF supports open source. The Free Software
Foundation (FSF) predates the open source movement by some years and does
not support open source.

The free software movement and open source approve of a lot of the same
licenses, and developers in both movements get along and work on programs
together, yes. But the licenses in common are approved of for very
different reasons that end up reaching radically different conclusions
(such as the free software movement endorsing free software and open source
advocates endorsing proprietary software).

The FSF has published some essays on precisely what the differences are
between free software and open source, why the FSF stands for free
software, and what that means on the ground:

Older essay: https://www.gnu.org/philosophy/free-software-for-freedom.html
Newer essay: http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/open-source-misses-the-point.html

Richard Stallman, the fellow who founded the free software movement,
started the FSF, and is the most widely known figure associated with
software freedom, gives talks and interviews around the world. Many of
these talks are recorded and available at https://audio-video.gnu.org/.
He's very clear to point out the distinction between what he started and
open source which started over a decade later. The most recent place I
found him mention this is his Slashdot interview
http://news.slashdot.org/story/15/09/09/2252212/interviews-rms-answers-your-questions
where he points to the aforementioned newer essay and says "before that
term [open source] was coined in 1998, the term "open software" was used to
mean something else. It meant that users could choose from various
components that could interoperate" and then answers a question building on
that.

Perhaps your disagreement with the FSF comes from not understanding what
they stand for and why they reach the conclusions they do.

onpon4
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Joined: 05/30/2012

> The Free Software
> Foundation (FSF) predates the open source movement by some years and does
> not support open source.

About 13 years. I wouldn't use the word "some" to describe that amount. ;)

bluzeo
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Joined: 08/27/2015

sorry man - my temper got really up there - i been trying to get things done lately and that not been a good hop - i am planing to stay with my next distro that i hoping to and stay there