Trisquel Noob Here

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Blackfish
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Joined: 07/24/2015

Howdy Folks,
Just tried Trisquel for the first time just yesterday. So far, very cool, but lots of bugs and glitches to be worked out. I downloaded all my files to a partition and it won't let me go to work on my own files! What the... ? Can't save the changes! It wants to make a new file, and then it won't let me save the changes I make to the new one either! Wow! Nor will it allow me to change permissions on my files so I can transfer them.

I'm not allowed access to the /root folder either! What's that supposed to mean? I thought this was free software!

I partitioned the hard drive, making a /root partition, then a /home partition, then a swap partition. Then the first installation didn't install correctly, and when I went to do everything over, I now find myself stuck with this sda5 partition I cannot delete! I then left the partitions alone and installed again. Things appear to be working fairly well this time around. But it won't let me wipe out that sda5 even if I am starting over completely! What's up with that?

I'm a Puppy and Quirky Linux user for the most part. So this Trisquel adventure is a new one on me. It acts a lot like my old Ubuntu Saucy Salamander and Trusty Tahr. Very cool, but very confusing in how it all works. I came over to Trisquel because I love the idea of freedom and free software, plus I wanted to learn the command line from an operating system with a full-boogie command line. Puppy and Quirky use both ASH, and BASH, and Busybox. So it's not easy to learn to begin with, and when one tries to use a machine with a full command line, very little of what one knows works in the terminal!

It's always a new adventure with a new Linux OS. Fun! Fun! Fun! Really! Truly! I couldn't live without it! Anyway, I will be searching the board for some answers to some of these little glitches. If anyone would like to chime in and help out, that would be fanatastic! Meantime I am up and running and this looks like a great OS! Thank you!

JadedCtrl
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Joined: 08/11/2014

A standard user cannot access the /root directory, only the root user can do so. To access it, you'll need to use either sudo or su.
And standard users cannot access some mounted devices and partitions so you may have to access it with sudo or su. In some cases, it may be easier to just give your user w/r access to the mount point.
Could I ask for the output of the "lsblk" command?

And as for sda5, perhaps you should try to remove it with GParted? Perhaps you can't remove it because it's mounted?

tomlukeywood
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Joined: 12/05/2014

for a user friendly way of accessing root directory’s
run
gksudo nautilus /root
in a terminal

you will of course need to enter your password to do so

the root user is just a user that has control over the hole system(unless your running non-free software)

and you have control over the root user but your just not loged in as a root user by default for security
but if you rely want to
you can login as root user

Blackfish
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Joined: 07/24/2015

i ran gksudo nautilus /root... I got a window that says: "Enter your password to perform administrative tasks" -- which I did. Then the password entry window vanished and the terminal returned to command entry perfectly. Does this mean I'm in? If so, it didn't change anything as far as my files go. I still can't open them and save the changes I make.

moxalt
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Joined: 06/19/2015

What that was supposed to do was open Nautilus, the graphical file manager, as
root, in /root. It evidently didn't work. I personally would just use the
terminal for any serious file management, but then that's just me.

As to your strange partitioning problem, what you seem to be doing is deleting
individual partitions all the time within the confines of the same partition
table. If you want a clean disk, boot with a live USB, run fdisk (make sure the
hard drive is not mounted- if so, umount it) and hit 'o'. That should create an
entirely new partition table on the disk. Hit 'w' to save changes and exit. You
now have a fresh disk with just a partition table. If you want a *really* clean
disk (that minty fresh feeling) dd if=/dev/zero of= and wait.

I personally think Trisquel's graphical installer is a piece of shit, and would
always use a netinst CD, so I can actually install what I want, and have a
decent installation experience. Anyway, in the disk partitioning step (this for
the text-based installer, but it should be roughly the same for the default
installer too) do not delete or add individual partitions first, but select the
disk itself. Example: you have your fucked up disk displayed below:

/dev/sda
/dev/sda1
/dev/sda2
/dev/sda5

Don't play around with the partitions, (sda1, 2, 5) select /dev/sda, and when
prompted to create a new partition table, select yes. /dev/sda is now clean.
You can add partitions to your heart's content now. Just don't mess up the
password thing this time.

I think it should be more or less the same in the graphical installer- hunt for
some 'make new partition table' option or something.

SuperTramp83

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Joined: 10/31/2014

I personally think Trisquel's graphical installer is a piece of shit, and would
always use a netinst CD, so I can actually install what I want, and have a
decent installation experience.

It is not. The installer is exactly and perfectly what it was meant to be: extremely user friendly. Trisquel as a distro was thought and executed to be as user friendly as possible and that is why it is based on Bugnunntu and not Debian. At least this is my understanding.

tomlukeywood
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Joined: 12/05/2014

"Then the password entry window vanished and the terminal returned to command entry perfectly"

this happens if you enter your password wrong

are you sure you entered your password correctly?

Blackfish
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Joined: 07/24/2015

lsbk says:
NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
sda 8:0 0 55.9G 0 disk
sda1 8:1 0 11.5G 0 part /
sda2 8:2 0 40.6G 0 part /home
sda3 8:3 0 3.8G 0 part [SWAP]
sr0 11:0 1 603M 0 rom /media -- etc.

Gparted says the sda5 is mounted and that it can't delete any mounted partitions. Then it tells to unmount the partition. But the partition does not show that it is mounted, and when I right-click to unmount, it does nothing. Even when I click to mount sda5 it does nothing. Even when I boot from the disk, either from Trisquel disk or another disk, e.g., Puppy or whatever, it won't delete that sda5 partition when I try to run the partition manager and wipe everything and start over.

I opened a terminal and used sudo and su... sudo gave me a bunch of "usage" gibberish and that was it. "su" gave me a password entry point, and when I put in the password it said, "su: Authentication failure". The only password I have given the machine is the one I put to it when I installed, the same one I use to log in at boot. And that password works just fine for that. So what password is needed is beyond me. I don't know of any other passwords.

Thanks for your help!

JadedCtrl
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Joined: 08/11/2014

To run a program with root access, you should use the "sudo" command. To use it, type in "sudo (command to run as root here)"
The second argument, which is "(command to run as root here)" is necessary to use sudo.
At first, it gives you usage gibberish, and then asks for your password. You then enter your password.
---
Perhaps now to remove sda5 you should try using fdisk.
Run the command "sudo fdisk /dev/sda"
Then, type "p" followed by hitting enter.
There should be a list of partitions. Count down the list until you reach sda5. It could be the third in the list, etc, but it'll probably be the fifth.
Then, type "d" followed by hitting enter.
It will ask which partition you want to delete-- then type the number you got for sda5, followed by enter.
Then, type "w" followed by hitting enter.
If you need any more help, this guide is a good one: http://tldp.org/HOWTO/Partition/fdisk_partitioning.html

Magic Banana

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Joined: 07/24/2010

The reason for your problem must be that the user id of the files you copied is not your user id. Assuming you put those files in your home folder, you can change the owner and group of all the files (recursively) by opening a terminal and executing the following command:

$ sudo chown -R $USER:$USER .

It's always a new adventure with a new Linux OS.

The OS is called GNU/Linux: https://www.gnu.org/gnu/linux-and-gnu.html

It matters: https://www.gnu.org/gnu/why-gnu-linux.html

Blackfish
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Joined: 07/24/2015

Now, just for fun, I stuck in my old Ubuntu Saucy Salamander disk and booted the machine, installed Ubuntu, and without creating any partitions. I just wiped all the old partitions out and used the entire drive for Ubuntu -- so the partition manager said at install.

Guess what? It didn't work. When all the installing was done, I rebooted from Quirky to see what partitions are on the drive, and sda1, sda5, and sda2 are still on the partition. Ubuntu simply installed over Trisquel and left the partitions alone. I did the same things with both a Puppy and a Quirky install, and the partitions are left alone again. Gparted still says it can't do anything to delete a mounted partition--even though, according to the partition itself, -- it isn't mounted!

Can't zap this "sda5" nonsense. That's the key here. Got to find the way to be rid of that. It's just messin' everything up.

Another interesting note on this is that when I boot from another operating system, say, Puppy or Quirky from USB stick, and I look at the partitions on the hard drive, there is sda1, sda5, and sda2, respectively, showing up on the screen. Now, when I click to mount either sda5 or sda2, either one, only sda1 mounts and unmounts! I guess it can mount only the /root partition? What in blazes is goin' on here?

JadedCtrl
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Joined: 08/11/2014

You could make a new patition table on sda-- it could be done with a gparted live CD, etc.

Blackfish
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Joined: 07/24/2015

Yes, interesting you should say that... I just booted from USB stick, then found sda1 and made sure it was unmounted. Then I opened up Gparted and deleted sda1. Now, Gparted says the entire drive is unallocated. I even tried to boot from the drive to be certain this was done... It's done. The machine would not boot from the drive. Nothing on it to boot from. But, now, here's where it gets really interesting... I rebooted Quirky from USB stick and looked at the partitions on the desktop again, and there all three, sda1, sda5, and sda2 are sitting, respectively, just like before. Then I opened Gparted again and it says the entire disk is unallocated still.

Groovy. I will try to install something else on the drive now and see if it does away with those partitions...

JadedCtrl
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Joined: 08/11/2014

In Quirky, you could try to mount one of the partitions and look at the data on them. If it can't mount the partition/there isn't data on the partition, then gparted is correct and Quirky is incorrect.

lembas
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Joined: 05/13/2010

> Now, just for fun, I stuck in my old Ubuntu Saucy Salamander disk and booted the machine, installed Ubuntu, and without creating any partitions. I just wiped all the old partitions out and used the entire drive for Ubuntu -- so the partition manager said at install.

> Guess what? It didn't work. When all the installing was done, I rebooted from Quirky to see what partitions are on the drive, and sda1, sda5, and sda2 are still on the partition.

You do strange things for fun. If you install a GNU/Linux distro, you will need partitions. (you need those in any operating system, they may be called something else in their lingo however) There is no option to not create partitions. your choices are automatically create partitions or manually create partitions.

Blackfish
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Joined: 07/24/2015

Correct.

You need to read my post again. I put the old Saucy Salamander disk in and booted and installed, thus allowing the installer wipe the drive and install everything fresh, making its own partition (which, once again, did not wipe off the sda5 partition, the partition that I did not in fact create. I have no idea where that came from. As far as I could see, when I partitioned, there was sda1, sda2, and sda3. The installation did the rest.). I realize it is not necessary to create my own partitions and make things difficult. But I want my hard drive set up a certain way, and in order to get that job done one needs to create partitions. I've been doing it for well over a year with my other Linux distros on various machines and never had any problems until I tried Trisquel the other day. I'm confident I will get all this stuff fixed up and master it all in due time.

lembas
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Joined: 05/13/2010

It probably did wipe the old sda5 and then make a new sda5. You need to select manual partitioning if you wish to have any control of the process.

And GNU/Linux.

Blackfish
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Joined: 07/24/2015

The deeper I go, the deeper it gets...

Now, I have used Gparted to (apparently) wipe out that sda5. I partitioned the hard drive once again and came up with an sda1 and an sda2, and a swap partition. (An interesting side note here is that this is the first time I have ever placed the swap partition at the end, as the last partition. In the past I had always put it in the center, between the two partitions. I put it at the end because an article I read said it was best to put it at the end or the beginning, so that it's easiest to get to.). I have never seen any of these kinds of problems prior to my doing this, so maybe it's got something to do with it? Dunno.).

Everything appeared normal, and so I slapped a frugal install of Tahr Pup onto the sda1 (only because Puppy is wicked fast and I didn't want to wait for a bigger installation). It didn't work. Wouldn't boot. So I stuck the disk back in there and installed it again, only a full install this time around. It still didn't boot, but instead went to the advanced menu options, which I selected, then shows me, in this order: a back to the main menu option, Previous menu (sda1/menu-2015-07-25-052559.1st), the Tahr install I just did, showing it as (sda1:PBS), then Find Grub2, Grub4DOS commandline, reboot computer, and halt computer. I selected the (sda1:PBS) and it said it was not bootable. So I went back to the menu and picked the Previous menu (sda1/menu-2015-07-25-052559.1st), which went to yet another menu displaying my installation and I can either click that and boot or simply wait for the timer to end and watch it boot by itself.

Wow! It's been quite a morning! Never seen any of this stuff ever before. It's the only way to live and learn!

moxalt
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Joined: 06/19/2015

Stop playing with deleting and adding partitions! It's a lost cause already!
Just boot a Trisquel netinstall CD, and create a clean partition table. THAT
DOES NOT MEAN INDIVIDUALLY DELETING PARTITIONS! As in my other post, just
select the disk (/dev/sda) itself, and say yes to a new partition table. Then
create two consecutive primary partitions, sda1 and sda2, with ext4 for the
filesystem on sda1 and swap on sda2. Install. You're making things far too
complicated for yourself.

Blackfish
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Joined: 07/24/2015

Did all that already. Didn't work. That sda5 beast wouldn't come off there. But I finally got it off, as you can read in my earlier posts. What you suggested here in your post might work now, but it sure didn't work before. I will give it a shot later. Thanks.

Cyberhawk

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Joined: 07/27/2010

Why exactly is sda5 unwanted? Is it because of the high number?

When installing Trisquel, I usually setup one (small) primary partition (/) and one (very big) logical partition (/home). Swap is usually a couple hundred MB big (depends on different factors) and sits at the end. The /home always comes out as sda5. I believe this is perfectly normal and not an error on the part of the installer. In order to create a new logical partition an extended partition has to be created first, which takes up one number (so you have sda1 for "/" and sda2 for the extended partition, which isn't usable by itself). Then two numbers seem to be reserved for something, so that the first logical partition that can be automatically created is sda5.

You may find it interesting to learn more about partitioning of hard drives here.

Here you can find information on partitions specific to Ubuntu (which is the base for Trisquel). Be aware, that Canonical has different views on software than this community and will call the OS Linux (instead of GNU/Linux) and they also don't oppose non-free software as much. But the technical aspects are all the same between Trisquel and Ubuntu.

Blackfish
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It's a learning thing. I gotta know. That's why I put myself through all this. Curious, intransigent mind at work.

Cyberhawk

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It's great to take the time and learn GNU/Linux. I remember doing it during my college years, good times :-D

Blackfish
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Got it! OK, well, not exactly, but... I still don't know where that sda5 came from, but I got rid of the whole mess. I can't tell what in the world I was doing wrong before, if anything, but that freakin' Gparted finally agreed to wipe the entire drive clean and did it. Why it wouldn't do it before is beyond me, but it's done now. Onward to other things. Thanks for all your help, everyone!

Now, off to get myself into more trouble and recreate my partitions, this time with the swap partition first! Ha! Ha! See how that works on this old bugger! Lookin' for the ultimate perfectly partitioned hard drive!

Blackfish
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Joined: 07/24/2015

Hello again! I'm back! I changed the version of Trisquel I have been using to the full version with GNOME! I absolutely love this thing.

I never did solve this password issue however. Nothing works.

I think it has to do with the manner in which I configure my hard drive? Just a guess, but here goes...

First off, I am running this version of Trisquel installed on a flash drive. It is not installed on my hard drive. Next, the hard drive has three partitions: 1. swap 2. primary partition where operating system is installed (Puppy Linux Tahr Pup). 3. primary partition where files are stored.

OK, what I need to get done here is to be able to access all files on the third partition and go to work on them. Trisquel will not allow it. Trisquel says I do not have permission to modify the files. I am to understand there are some passwords I can initiate that will make it possible to do that. Is there someone who knows how to do this?

Garsmith
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Joined: 07/27/2013

I did not read all the posts because they are old and Im lazy, but I wonder what password problem? Have you only flashed a USB stick with the installation ISO of Trisquel 7 and using it and have not installed it? If you dont want to install it on the computers drive, install it on another USB stick.

Blackfish
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Joined: 07/24/2015

Trisquel is installed on my USB stick from the live DVD.

I boot from the USB stick drive and run Trisquel from there.

That's not the problem...

The problem is accessing files on the hard drive partition. I can read them. I can even save them as something else if I do modify them. But I cannot modify the existing files and save the changes. Trisquel says I do not have permission to do that.

How to use this "su" and "sudo" password (if that is in fact the case) business to get my way with my own freakin' files?

lembas
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Joined: 05/13/2010

Find out your USERNAME withwhoamithen plug it tosudo chown -R USERNAME:USERNAME /path/to/target/

This will make you owner of all files recursively under that path. Enjoy your files! :)

Blackfish
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Joined: 07/24/2015

Wow! This actually worked! After all this time and messing about-I finally have the key!

And I thank you!

Now, is this command going to work in all the other Linux distros that won't let me control my own files, too?

Thank you again!

Magic Banana

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It does. But never change the owner/group/permissions of system files!

Notice that I gave you the same solution (written more efficiently though) more than two weeks ago: https://trisquel.info/forum/trisquel-noob-here#comment-74352

Blackfish
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Joined: 07/24/2015

Now, everything went weird again...

I had to change operating systems again-the full version was just too bloody slow on this old machine. I made a copy of Trisquel Mini and booted. It runs much quicker. And that was when I tried the commands above and was able to work my files. Then I installed the operating system to the USB drive and tried the same command...

I don't know what is going on here, but once my new install is booted the partitions on the hard drive are not mounted nor do I have permission to mount them. I tried the command to get to the partitions anyway and it says, naturally, there is no such files or directory.

How do I mount the partitions?

lembas
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Joined: 05/13/2010

One mounts things with the ... mount command. To see manual pageman mount

By default you have to prepend the command with sudo as only root gets to mount.

If your USB is persistent then you probably want to include that path in your fstab. Read its manual page for more info.

Blackfish
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Joined: 07/24/2015

Thanks for your reply.

I cannot make heads nor tails of this stuff. Near as I can tell, I am supposed to be using the sudo command: sudo chown -R USERNAME:USERNAME mount -t path/to/file system Perhaps not. I don't know. The documentation is written so incredibly poorly and with very little explanation that it is very hard to tell what to do with this mountain of information!

Trisquel (booted from the USB drive) sees my hard drive file system I want to access not as what it is named when I created it, but as "500 GB Volume". I have tried every command and combination of commands I can think of, using the name Trisquel assigned to the file system, and my original name of the file system, with zero positive results. I am at my wit's end. Can't tell where to go from here. Bizarre!

Anyone?

Magic Banana

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Could you better explain the problem you are facing? What you did and what you want is not clear at all to me. Did you install Trisquel or are you using the Live system? If you installed it, was it on the internal hard drive or on an external device? As far as I understand, the files you are talking about are on another partition/drive. Does its filesystem automount? What is its type? Do you now have the proper permissions to modify its files? What is the content of /etc/fstab? Is it only a labeling issue you are talking about?

lembas
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You'll get the hang of it, don't worry. The sudo command means that the next command will be performed with super user powers. And you wish to mount, so now what you need issudo mount /filesystem/you/wish/to/mount /where/you/want/to/mount/it

(In the command you mentioned sudo gave the chown command super user powers.)

Note that Nautilus (the file browser) might auto-mount for you or include it in the left hand filesystem list where you can right click > mount it, or perhaps just left click. Then it will be mounted under /mnt

Magic Banana

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I believe automounts happen in /media, not /mnt.

lembas
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Could well be so.

Blackfish
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OK, here's what I did and what I'm doing.

I burned a copy of Trisquel Mini and booted from it. Earlier in this thread you guys showed me the sudo chown -R username:username command to get to the files on the hard drive and it worked like hot butter over popcorn. I got to my files and went to work.

Next, I installed Trisquel Mini to a USB flash drive and booted from it, then tried the same command to get to the files on the hard drive and set to work again. It did not work.

I looked in the File Manager and noticed the partition I am trying to get to on the hard drive is not recognized by the name I gave it when I created it. It is no longer, sda3, but Trisquel sees it as, 500 GB Volume. I tried both names and neither worked. I thought perhaps the drive is not mounted, and so I went to work trying to get it mounted. But every combination of commands I could think of would not get it mounted. This is where I am stuck right now. Perhaps it is mounted already and I just don't know how to write the correct command? That must be it because I can see it as, 500 GB Volume - right? I really don't know. I am so confused. I feel like the Mad Hatter. I think I am actually finally going over the edge. It's all over. Life is a bore and a drag. I can't take it any longer. Oh, wait, let's see... where was I?... Oh, yes! Here I am!

Just to give the rundown on the computer I am using, if that might help anything: It is a Dell Latitude E5500. The hard drive has three partitions, one is swap, the next is ext4 running Tahr Pup 6.0.3 CE, and the last is ext4 with nothing installed on it. It is where all my files are stored, the same file system I accessed with the Trisquel DVD the first time I booted it, and these are the files I am trying to access now.

Recap: I am running Trisquel Mini from USB flash - trying to access the ext file system on one of the partitions of my hard drive.

lembas
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In file manager, what happens if you left click it?

Blackfish
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Right click or left click gets: "Not authorized to perform operation"

Magic Banana

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Next, I installed Trisquel Mini to a USB flash drive and booted from it, then tried the same command to get to the files on the hard drive and set to work again. It did not work.

What is the error message?

I looked in the File Manager and noticed the partition I am trying to get to on the hard drive is not recognized by the name I gave it when I created it. It is no longer, sda3, but Trisquel sees it as, 500 GB Volume.

This is normal behavior. You can label a filesystem using for instance the "Disks" utility in the "System settings" (select the disk, the partition and click on the gears and then choose to "edit filesystem") or the commands it calls and that are specific to a type of filesystem (e.g., 'e2label' changes the label on an ext2/ext3/ext4 filesystem). But, again, that will not solve your permission issue.

Perhaps it is mounted already

The 'mount' command (no argument) lists the mounted filesystems.

What is the content of your /etc/fstab?

The hard drive has three partitions, one is swap, the next is ext4 running Tahr Pup 6.0.3 CE, and the last is ext4 with nothing installed on it. It is where all my files are stored

You want the same user id (uid) for Puppy and Trisquel. Otherwise you would have to change the permissions every time you switch from one system to the other one. In Trisquel you can do that from the "Advanced parameters" of the user. 'users-admin' is the related command. You first need to create a new user with administrative privileges to edit the previous user with this new one. Or the id of the new user can be directly chosen to match that of Puppy (and you then use that account).

The uid in puppy can be read from the third column of the line in /etc/passwd that starts with your login (or typing 'echo $UID' from Puppy's terminal).

What about overwriting Puppy with Trisquel? :-p

Blackfish
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Joined: 07/24/2015

There is no problem with permissions in Puppy. It gives you root automatically. This is why all the frustration with passwords and mounting and all the rest of the nonsense. I have never had to learn it using Puppy. I am paying the price for that now. To my mind, security is user responsibility. Puppy allows me to set my passwords the way I want-not the other way around. With Puppy, I can boot from any of my USB drives or other hard drives and do whatever I want with my files. I can pick whatever flavor I want to work in today and get going.

I can see now this is going to be endless and extremely difficult, i.e., not worth all the mess. Yes, I could take the easy way out and just copy my files over to Trisquel or copy Trisquel over Puppy, I know what already, but that's not learning much.

Free software is great, yes, but it still has a long, long, long way to go before it will ever appeal to the average user. This is why Ubuntu distros, the Mint distros, and all the rest of the more popular operating systems get all the attention... because the free software community has yet to come up with an operating system that is polished and works as easily as they do.

I will find another way around this. Thanks for your help.

ADFENO
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Joined: 12/31/2012

Go to your favourite operating system and, please, give us the outputs of:

mount

lsblk

lsblk --all

sudo blkid

Then boot a live image of Trisquel and, please, give us the outputs of:

mount

lsblk

lsblk --all

sudo blkid

Blackfish
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Joined: 07/24/2015

These are the results of all the commands from the live Trisquel Mini DVD boot:

trisquel@trisquel:~$ mount
/cow on / type overlayfs (rw)
proc on /proc type proc (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev)
sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev)
udev on /dev type devtmpfs (rw,mode=0755)
devpts on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,noexec,nosuid,gid=5,mode=0620)
tmpfs on /run type tmpfs (rw,noexec,nosuid,size=10%,mode=0755)
/dev/sr0 on /cdrom type iso9660 (ro,noatime)
/dev/loop0 on /rofs type squashfs (ro,noatime)
none on /sys/fs/cgroup type tmpfs (rw)
none on /sys/fs/fuse/connections type fusectl (rw)
none on /sys/kernel/debug type debugfs (rw)
none on /sys/kernel/security type securityfs (rw)
tmpfs on /tmp type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev)
none on /run/lock type tmpfs (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev,size=5242880)
none on /run/shm type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev)
none on /run/user type tmpfs (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev,size=104857600,mode=0755)
none on /sys/fs/pstore type pstore (rw)
systemd on /sys/fs/cgroup/systemd type cgroup (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev,none,name=systemd)
gvfsd-fuse on /run/user/999/gvfs type fuse.gvfsd-fuse (rw,nosuid,nodev,user=trisquel)
/dev/mmcblk0p1 on /media/trisquel/aca6ef85-8310-4299-b497-3893975a4b5a type ext3 (rw,nosuid,nodev,uhelper=udisks2)
/dev/sda3 on /media/trisquel/357b0a3a-250d-4d31-a126-5a3abffefe95 type ext4 (rw,nosuid,nodev,uhelper=udisks2)
/dev/sda2 on /media/trisquel/22f63502-6860-48b5-85c8-b4d368389187 type ext4 (rw,nosuid,nodev,uhelper=udisks2)
trisquel@trisquel:~$

trisquel@trisquel:~$ lsblk
NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
sda 8:0 0 149.1G 0 disk
├─sda1 8:1 0 8G 0 part
├─sda2 8:2 0 10G 0 part /media/trisquel/22f63502-6860-48b5-85c8-b4
└─sda3 8:3 0 131.1G 0 part /media/trisquel/357b0a3a-250d-4d31-a126-5a
sr0 11:0 1 4.4G 0 rom /cdrom
loop0 7:0 0 582.8M 1 loop /rofs
mmcblk0 179:0 0 970.5M 0 disk
└─mmcblk0p1 179:1 0 969M 0 part /media/trisquel/aca6ef85-8310-4299-b497-38
trisquel@trisquel:~$

trisquel@trisquel:~$ lsblk --all
NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
sda 8:0 0 149.1G 0 disk
├─sda1 8:1 0 8G 0 part
├─sda2 8:2 0 10G 0 part /media/trisquel/22f63502-6860-48b5-85c8-b4
└─sda3 8:3 0 131.1G 0 part /media/trisquel/357b0a3a-250d-4d31-a126-5a
sr0 11:0 1 4.4G 0 rom /cdrom
ram0 1:0 0 64M 0 disk
ram1 1:1 0 64M 0 disk
ram2 1:2 0 64M 0 disk
ram3 1:3 0 64M 0 disk
ram4 1:4 0 64M 0 disk
ram5 1:5 0 64M 0 disk
ram6 1:6 0 64M 0 disk
ram7 1:7 0 64M 0 disk
ram8 1:8 0 64M 0 disk
ram9 1:9 0 64M 0 disk
loop0 7:0 0 582.8M 1 loop /rofs
loop1 7:1 0 0 loop
loop2 7:2 0 0 loop
loop3 7:3 0 0 loop
loop4 7:4 0 0 loop
loop5 7:5 0 0 loop
loop6 7:6 0 0 loop
loop7 7:7 0 0 loop
ram10 1:10 0 64M 0 disk
ram11 1:11 0 64M 0 disk
ram12 1:12 0 64M 0 disk
ram13 1:13 0 64M 0 disk
ram14 1:14 0 64M 0 disk
ram15 1:15 0 64M 0 disk
mmcblk0 179:0 0 970.5M 0 disk
└─mmcblk0p1 179:1 0 969M 0 part /media/trisquel/aca6ef85-8310-4299-b497-38
trisquel@trisquel:~$

trisquel@trisquel:~$ sudo blkid
/dev/loop0: TYPE="squashfs"
/dev/mmcblk0p1: UUID="aca6ef85-8310-4299-b497-3893975a4b5a" TYPE="ext3"
/dev/sda1: UUID="19aec0ff-a25b-439a-a190-5b7c7f4ad52d" TYPE="swap"
/dev/sda2: UUID="22f63502-6860-48b5-85c8-b4d368389187" TYPE="ext4"
/dev/sda3: UUID="357b0a3a-250d-4d31-a126-5a3abffefe95" TYPE="ext4"
/dev/sr0: LABEL="trisquel-mini 7.0 amd64" TYPE="iso9660"
trisquel@trisquel:~$

Magic Banana

I am a member!

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Joined: 07/24/2010

/dev/sda3 on /media/trisquel/357b0a3a-250d-4d31-a126-5a3abffefe95 type ext4 (rw,nosuid,nodev,uhelper=udisks2)
/dev/sda2 on /media/trisquel/22f63502-6860-48b5-85c8-b4d368389187 type ext4 (rw,nosuid,nodev,uhelper=udisks2)

Given what you wrote, one of those filesystems is the one with the files you want to access. They are mounted with read and write accesses. Just look at /media/trisquel/357b0a3a-250d-4d31-a126-5a3abffefe95 or /media/trisquel/22f63502-6860-48b5-85c8-b4d368389187

That its files are probably owned by another user. That is why you needed 'chmod'. That is why you should have the same uid for the different users that represent you on the different systems you installed.

Blackfish
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Joined: 07/24/2015

I don't know what you mean by "files are probably owned by another user." No one but I has ever touched this computer. When it is not in use, it is shut down and unplugged. How could another user own my files?

Magic Banana

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Joined: 07/24/2010

UNIX files have owners. More precisely the meta-data of any file includes a user id (uid for short) and, as its name suggests, the user id identifies a user. If you use different users (potentially on different systems) with different uids, then the file that belongs to you with a user does not belong to you with the other user. It matters because the owner may have permissions on the file (encoded as well in the meta-data on the file) that other users do not have. For instance, the owner may be allowed to modify the file, whereas the other users cannot do that.

lembas
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Joined: 05/13/2010

What MB said. Also the chown command you successfully used earlier stands for "change owner".

ADFENO
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Joined: 12/31/2012

Go to your favourite operating system and, please, give us the outputs of:

mount

lsblk

lsblk --all

sudo blkid

Then boot a live image of Trisquel and, please, give us the outputs of:

mount

lsblk

lsblk --all

sudo blkid

Magic Banana

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Joined: 07/24/2010

There is no problem with permissions in Puppy. It gives you root automatically. This is why all the frustration with passwords and mounting and all the rest of the nonsense.

It is not nonsense at all. Using Puppy as root means any vulnerability in any program you run, or any malware in any proprietary software Puppy ships, gives the attacker the whole control over your system (typically used to install a Troyan that starts at bootup and make your system be part of a botnet).

I could take the easy way out and just copy my files over to Trisquel or copy Trisquel over Puppy, I know what already, but that's not learning much.

You are invited to learn about permissions: http://www.hackinglinuxexposed.com/articles/20030417.html and http://www.hackinglinuxexposed.com/articles/20030424.html or even 'info "File permissions"' in a terminal for the gory details.

Free software is great, yes, but it still has a long, long, long way to go before it will ever appeal to the average user. This is why Ubuntu distros, the Mint distros, and all the rest of the more popular operating systems get all the attention...

Trisquel is based on Ubuntu. It is not harder than Ubuntu. The average user does not run two distributions in parallel.

Blackfish
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Joined: 07/24/2015

I am aware that Trisquel is based on Ubuntu. And you do have some valid points here, save for the password stuff. If Trisquel does not ship with proprietary software or any malware to begin with... then why worry about password protection? The password protection is a hangover from Ubuntu? Or is Triquel and Ubuntu trying to password protect the user from... himself? Lol. I prefer security is user choice and responsibility. I have been running Puppy for almost two years now with no problems. I did not need to be protected from me. But that's just my view. I am not trying to be argumentative.

Thanks for the tips on permissions.

Thanks for your help.