12-hour vs. 24-hour clock

24 respostas [Última entrada]
AndrewT

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Personally, I've always used a 12-hour clock format and it's the standard in my part of the world (America). Ubuntu also has a 12-hour clock by default.

I wonder: why is Trisquel's default clock format 24-hour?

Magic Banana

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The nerd does not even open her/his window. She/He hates Windows. How could she/he know if it is morning or afternoon! :-)

bifeo3
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Think in terms of hours, not just 1-12, 1-12, 1-12. Use the 24 hour clock so that you know you're squeezing the best out of every hour of the day.

And what the heck, the American military uses the 24 hour clock, so why not we regular Americans?

quiliro@congresolibre.org
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name at domain">
> Think in terms of hours, not just 1-12, 1-12, 1-12. Use the 24 hour clock
> so
> that you know you're squeezing the best out of every hour of the day.
>
> And what the heck, the American military uses the 24 hour clock, so why
> not
> we regular Americans?
>
The American, the European, the Asian, and all the military in all the
continents that use ISO normalization. As well as in Ecuador, colombia
Venezuela and Brazil which are also part of America. it is not a military
normative it is a general one.

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Quiliro Ordóñez
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bifeo3
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All I'm saying is, we Americans love to think two things:

1) That we invented everything. Especially everything that is awesome.

2) That we are the best and only real military in the world.

End sarcasm. Sort of.

:-)

psz
psz
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On Wed, Jan 05, 2011 at 11:09:15PM +0100, name at domain wrote:
> All I'm saying is, we Americans love to think two things:
> 1) That we invented everything. Especially everything that is awesome.
> 2) That we are the best and only real military in the world.

3) American always save the world. They have Batman, Superman and Bruce Willis
;-)

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Pawel K. Szulczewski

quiliro@congresolibre.org
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name at domain">
> All I'm saying is, we Americans love to think two things:
>

You mean, some americans. Most americans don't think that way, especially
colombians, peruvians, argentinians and others beside those cited on my
last email.

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Quiliro Ordóñez
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Quito, Ecuador

AndrewT

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Apparently, the 24-hour clock is most commonly used around the world except for a handful of countries, particularly in Australia, Canada (except Quebec), India, the Philippines, Pakistan, the United Kingdom and the United States. So, we probably should stick with the 24-hour format.

akirashinigami

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I think the clock format should be determined automatically at installation time, depending on your regional settings. That information is already used to determine time zone; why not clock format as well?

AndrewT

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That's a good idea. It works that way in Windows.

Jose Benito

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whatever, you can customize the way that clock it shows http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2010/10/how-to-customize-the-clock-applet-in-ubuntu/

psz
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On Wed, May 04, 2011 at 06:49:36AM +0200, name at domain wrote:
> In my experience, nobody outside of the military uses 24-hour time
> when they are talking.

I guess in Poland for example, 12-hour time is not used in any cases...

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Pawel Szulczewski

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Daemonax
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Because no-one in Poland can afford a clock. *runs away*

On Wed, 2011-05-04 at 08:14 +0200, Pawel Szulczewski wrote:
> On Wed, May 04, 2011 at 06:49:36AM +0200, name at domain wrote:
> > In my experience, nobody outside of the military uses 24-hour time
> > when they are talking.
>
> I guess in Poland for example, 12-hour time is not used in any cases...
>

Henry Jensen
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On Wed, 4 May 2011 08:14:03 +0200
Pawel Szulczewski <name at domain> wrote:

> On Wed, May 04, 2011 at 06:49:36AM +0200, name at domain wrote:
> > In my experience, nobody outside of the military uses 24-hour time
> > when they are talking.
>
> I guess in Poland for example, 12-hour time is not used in any cases...

So it isn't in Germany in most cases. It's too confusing when someone says "at 5 o'clock".
You always have to ask "in the morning or afternoon?".

javatxu
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In almost all countries in Europe we use the 24hs format I don't know why we
should use the american one

2011/5/4 <name at domain>

> In my experience, nobody outside of the military uses 24-hour time when
> they are talking. So 12-hour time is what everyone is most familiar with.
> Also, you need to do mental arithmetic for 24-hour times from 1pm to the
> instant before midnight. (Minus 10 then minus 2 from the hour.)
> Rolex Watches
>
>

quiliro@congresolibre.org
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El 04/05/11 09:39, crazyby gnulinuxlibre escribió:
> In almost all countries in Europe we use the 24hs format I don't know
> why we should use the american one

In most of America (Ecuador, Peru, Chile, Argentina, Brazil, Panama,
Mexico, etc.) we use both formats. Only the USA uses exclusively 12
hours. 24 hours is a standard. If the USA wants to go on its own its OK
with me but they shouldn't impose their own ways on others.
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cladelpino
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+1 to quirillo!

2011/5/4 Quiliro Ordóñez <name at domain>:
> El 04/05/11 09:39, crazyby gnulinuxlibre escribió:
>>
>> In almost all countries in Europe we use the 24hs format I don't know why
>> we should use the american one
>
> In most of America (Ecuador, Peru, Chile, Argentina, Brazil, Panama, Mexico,
> etc.) we use both formats. Only the USA uses exclusively 12 hours. 24 hours
> is a standard. If the USA wants to go on its own its OK with me but they
> shouldn't impose their own ways on others.
> --
> Quiliro Ordóñez
> 08 836 2718
> 02 340 1517
>

akirashinigami

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I don't think anyone's imposing anything on anyone. I think we should either give users the option of choosing their preferred clock format during installation, or use the time zone regional data to set a default clock format.

BinaryDigit
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I agree, giving an option to choose a preferred format, or using the time zone regional data to set a default clock format would be the best solution.

In any case its not a problem, because you can right-click the clock in the panel, and using Preferences, select the 12 Hour or 24 Hour Format.

Simples!
http://youtu.be/4Ust9YBlEfY

akirashinigami

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True. Actually, I never actually noticed that we use the 24 hour format by default; I just assumed I had switched it over at some point and forgotten about it. I actually prefer the 24 hour format, even though I live in the US.

arielenter

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I live in Mexico and I prefer to use the 12-hour format. The bad thing I have notice in gnome since a along time now is that, if you chose to use Spanish (Mexico) for your session it does not give you the option to switch from 24-hour to 12-hour. There is a work around but it has been like that for years now. I'm going to see if it hasn't been reported yet on the gnome community and make a ticket if needed.

brianc
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Just a quote from Wikipaedia : - It's not important really, we are all free to choose whatever format we like. I like the 24 hr format because it's easy and logical. Anyway - here's the quate.

The 24-hour time system has been used for centuries, primarily by scientists, astronomers, navigators, and horologists. There are many surviving examples of clocks built using the 24-hour system, including the famous Orloj in Prague, and the Shepherd gate clock at Greenwich.

The British and Canadian militaries first started to use the 24-hour clock in late 1917.[6] Previous to this, military orders were drafted using the familiar "a.m." and "p.m." suffixes.

In Britain, the use of the 24-hour clock in daily life has grown steadily since the beginning of the 20th century. In 1934, the Radio Times switched to the 24-hour clock for programme listings. The experiment was halted after five months following widespread protests from readers, and has used the 12-hour clock ever since. More recently, BBC Weather television forecasts used the 12-hour notation for several months in 2005, after its graphical revamp. After complaints from the public, however, this was switched to 24-hour notation.[

brianc
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Damn! Spellings. For "quate" read "quote" and for "Wikipaedia", read "Wikipedia"