The volumen "boot" has only 4,1 MB disk space remaining.

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CESQ
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Joined: 01/02/2016

Please, help me, can I modify the volume "boot" size? Or How can I modify that boot size?

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Screenshot from 2018-12-15 12:26:00.png907.07 KB
Cyberhawk

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Joined: 07/27/2010

It can be done, but it might involve reinstalling Trisquel.

Please show us what your hard drive looks like. What we need here, is the output of the following commands:

sudo fdisk -l

and

df -h

Edit: one more thing that would be interesting. Please show us the output of:

ls -lsah /boot

Magic Banana

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Joined: 07/24/2010

I bet on many kernels (the listing of /boot will tell): 'executing 'sudo apt autoremove' in a terminal would solve that.

SuperTramp83

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>I bet on many kernels

That's also my bet. Remove all old kernels, except the currently working one and a backup one.

o/

nadebula.1984
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Joined: 05/01/2018

Just uninstall some old kernel image(s). First try this command:

# apt autoremove

If those cannot be automatically deleted, you can try Synaptic package manager. You can also try to search something like "ubuntu delete old kernel" or "debian delete old kernel" on the web.

Typically, I use a partition with 1~2 GB capacity for the /boot mount point.

Magic Banana

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I keep /boot on /. I guess you separate /home from / to have its files on a different type of filesystem. The hypothetical time gain (in ms) is probably lost the first time you forgot to remove the older kernels for some time and face the problem CESQ reports.

nadebula.1984
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Joined: 05/01/2018

I do have separate /boot and /home partitions. On UEFI-based systems, I have both /boot and /boot/efi (ESP) partitions.

Magic Banana

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Joined: 07/24/2010

Why?

SuperTramp83

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/
/boot
/var
/tmp
/home

That's how adults partition their hard drive.

Magic Banana

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Do you use a different type of filesystem for /boot and /var than you use for /? If not, I see no point. If you do: why? For performance reasons?

It is actually my reason to have /tmp's files on a tmpfs filesystem. But I have a lot of RAM (16 GB) and sometimes generate large temporary files for my work. For most desktop users, I would not recommend it.